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System Configuration Files

For details about the files and commands summarized here, consult the appropriate man pages or Solaris Documentation

File
Description
/etc/bootparams Contains information regarding network boot clients.
/etc/cron.d/cron.allow
/etc/cron.d/cron.deny
Allow access to crontab for users listed in this file. If the file does not exist, access is permitted for users not in the /etc/cron.d/cron.deny file.
/etc/defaultdomain NIS domain set by /etc/init.d/inetinit
/etc/default/cron Sets cron logging with the CRONLOG variable.
/etc/default/login Controls root logins via specification of the CONSOLE variable, as well as variables for login logging thresholds and password requirements.
/etc/default/su Determines logging activity for su attempts via the SULOG and SYSLOG variables, sets some initial environment variables for su sessions.
/etc/dfs/dfstab Determines which directories will be NFS-shared at boot time. Each line is a share command.
/etc/dfs/sharetab Contains a table of resources that have been shared via share.
/etc/group Provides groupname translation information.
/etc/hostname.interface Assigns a hostname to interface; assigns an IP address by cross- referencing /etc/inet/hosts.
/etc/hosts.allow
/etc/hosts.deny
Determine which hosts will be allowed access to TCP wrapper mediated services.
/etc/hosts.equiv Determines which set of hosts will not need to provide passwords when using the "r" remote access commands (eg rlogin, rsh, rexec)
/etc/inet/hosts
/etc/hosts
Associates hostnames and IP addresses.
/etc/inet/inetd.conf
/etc/inetd.conf
Identifies the services that are started by inetd as well as the manner in which they are started. inetd.conf may even specify that TCP wrappers be used to protect a service.
/etc/inittab inittab is used by init to determine scripts to for different run levels as well as a default run level.
/etc/logindevperm Contains information to change permissions for devices upon console logins.
/etc/magic Database of magic numbers that identify file types for file.
/etc/mail/aliases
/etc/aliases
Contains mail aliases recognized by sendmail.
/etc/mail/sendmail.cf
/etc/sendmail.cf
Mail configuration file for sendmail.
/etc/minor_perm Specifies permissions for device files; used by drvconfig
/etc/mnttab Contains information about currently mounted resources.
/etc/name_to_major List of currently configured major device numbers; used by drvconfig.
/etc/netconfig Network configuration database read during network initialization.
/etc/netgroup Defines groups of hosts and/or users.
/etc/netmasks Determines default netmask settings.
/etc/nsswitch.conf Determines order in which different information sources are accessed when performing lookups.
/etc/path_to_inst Contents of physical device tree using physical device names and instance numbers.
/etc/protocols Known protocols.
/etc/remote Attributes for tip sessions.
/etc/rmtab Currently mounted filesystems.
/etc/rpc Available RPC programs.
/etc/services Well-known networking services and associated port numbers.
/etc/syslog.conf Configures syslogd logging.
/etc/system Can be used to force kernel module loading or set kernel tuneable parameters.
/etc/vfstab Information for mounting local and remote filesystems.
/var/adm/messages Main log file used by syslogd.
/var/adm/sulog Default log for recording use of su command.
/var/adm/utmpx User and accounting information.
/var/adm/wtmpx User login and accounting information.
/var/local/etc/ftpaccess
/var/local/etc/ftpconversions
/var/local/etc/ftpusers
wu-ftpd configuration files to set ftp access rights, conversion/compression types, and a list of userids to exclude from ftp operations.
/var/lp/log Print services activity log.
/var/sadm/install/contents Database of installed software packages.
/var/saf/_log Logs activity of SAF (Service Access Facility).



Page © 2011 by the Trustees of Princeton University.
Content © 2011 by Scott Cromar, from The Solaris Troubleshooting Handbook. Used with permission.
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