ARC 374

Computational Design

Professor/Instructor

Axel Kilian

This course will examine the possibilities of representation and information in the virtual realm. Through a series of modeling/rendering/compositing exercises, presentations, and in-class discussions, students will investigate the evolving relationship between architecture and its means of representation, as well as broader issues of technology and culture. The course will provide a firm understanding of current computer software. One three-hour seminar.

ARC 401 / URB 401

Theories of Housing and Urbanism

Professor/Instructor

Andrew Laing

Housing ideas and urban projects of architects and social scientists since the mid-19th century as a response to industrialization, the development of the welfare state, the rise of professionalism, and the dispersion of democratic culture. Material drawn from architecture, urban planning, political theory, sociology, and social psychology. One three-hour seminar.

ARC 403

Topics in the History and Theory of Architecture

Professor/Instructor

Samia Henni

Selected issues in relationship to the development of architectural history and theory as critical disciplines, emphasizing the historiography and methodology of these disciplines. Course focuses on particular critics through a close reading and analysis of selected texts. One three-hour seminar.

ARC 404

Advanced Design Studio

Professor/Instructor

Annie Rachel Barrett

Examines architecture as cultural production, taking into account its capacity to structure both physical environments and social organizations. A specific problem or topic area will be set by each studio critic, and may include a broad range of building types, urban districts or regional landscapes, questions of sustainability, building materials, or building performance. Studio work will include research and data gathering, analysis, and program definition. Students are expected to master a full range of design media, including drawing, model-making, and computer-aided design.

POL 403 / CHV 403 / ARC 405 / URB 403

Architecture and Democracy

Professor/Instructor

What kind of public architecture is appropiate for a democracy? Should public spaces and buildings reflect democratic values - such as transparency and accessibility - or is the crucial requirement for democratic architecture that the process of arriving at decisions about the built environment is as particpatory as possible? The course will introduce students to different theories of democracy, to different approaches to architecture, and to many examples of government architecture from around the world (the U.S., Germany, and China in particular), via images and films. Might include one or two field trips.

ARC 406 / ENV 406

Energy and Form

Professor/Instructor

Introduction to concepts of energy utilization and conservation in building. Course presents the physics of building thermal performance, including quantitative methods, and discusses conservation strategies in building design and source energy. Passive design and alternative energy sources, including wind and solar-thermal, will be covered. One three-hour seminar.

ART 445 / ARC 445

Topics in the History and Theory of Architecture in Early-Modern Europe

Professor/Instructor

Carolyn Yerkes

Topics will focus on major figures, such as Palladio, Wren, and Piranesi; centers, such as Rome and Venice; or themes, such as architectural theory, the legacy of classical antiquity, and the villa. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 2 distribution requirement. One three-hour seminar.

ART 458 / ECS 458 / ARC 458 / FRE 458

Seminar. Modern Architecture

Professor/Instructor

A study of some of the major themes and movements of modern architecture from the late 19th century to the present day. Students will be encouraged to examine the social and political context, to probe the architects' intellectual background, and consider issues of class and gender in their relation to architectural and urban form. For department majors, this course satisfies the Group 3 distribution requirement. One three-hour seminar.

ARC 492 / URB 492 / ENV 492

Topics in the Formal Analysis of the Urban Structure

Professor/Instructor

Mario Isaac Gandelsonas

The Western city, American and European, has undergone a number of mutations since the Renaissance. This course will explore the complex relationships between different cities and architecture, between "real" cities and "fictional" architectural cities. Possible topics might include: urbanization as it affects contemporary life; the American vs. European city; the state of New Jersey, the exurban state "par excellence." One three-hour seminar.

ARC 501

Architecture Design Studio

Professor/Instructor

Michael Meredith, Erin Dayle Besler

A two-semester sequence in which fundamental design skills are taught in the context of the architect¿s wider responsibilities to society, culture and the environment. Students acquire a command of the techniques of design and representation through a series of specific architectural problems of increasing complexity. Both semesters required for three-year M.Arch. students.

ARC 502

Architecture Design Studio

Professor/Instructor

Mónica Ponce de León, Iman Salam Fayyad

A two-semester sequence in which fundamental design skills are taught in the context of the architect¿s wider responsibilities to society, culture and the environment. Students acquire a command of the techniques of design and representation through a series of specific architectural problems of increasing complexity. Both semesters required for three-year M.Arch. students.

ARC 504

Integrated Building Studios

Professor/Instructor

Jesse A. Reiser

Integrated design studios approach architecture from a synthetic perspective. Considerations of structure, environmental technology, building materials and systems, exterior envelope, and site design are integrated directly into the design process through the participation of technical faculty and outside advisors in critiques and reviews. Projects are developed to a high level of detail. At least one course is required for professional M.Arch. students. Fall, Spring.

ARC 507

Thesis Studio

Professor/Instructor

Jesse A. Reiser

An independent design project on a theme selected by the student. The thesis project is an opportunity for each student to define an individual position with regard to a specific aspect of architectural practice. As an integral part of the design process, it is intended that the thesis project will incorporate research, programming and site definition. One course is required for all M.Arch. students. Completion of pre-thesis workshops is required for entry into Thesis Studio. Fall, Spring.

ARC 508

Thesis Studio

Professor/Instructor

Elizabeth Diller, Jesse A. Reiser

An independent design project on a theme selected by the student. The thesis project is an opportunity for each student to define an individual position with regard to a specific aspect of architectural practice. As an integral part of the design process, it is intended that the thesis project will incorporate research, programming and site definition. One course is required for all M.Arch. students. Completion of pre-thesis workshops is required for entry into Thesis Studio. Fall, Spring.

ARC 509

Integrated Building Systems

Professor/Instructor

Peter A. Pelsinski

An introduction to building systems and the methods of construction used to realize design in built form. Focus of the first half of the course is on primary systems, materials and principles used in construction of buildings and the fabrication of elements. Focus then shifts to examining how information is communicated from designers to fabricators, and current standards that exist in the practice of architecture and its relation to changes in methods of fabrication and project delivery. Lectures and laboratory sessions.

ARC 510

Structural Analysis for Architecture

Professor/Instructor

An introduction to the analysis and design of structural systems for buildings, including beams, columns, arches, and other structural members. The structural behavior of individual elements and simple structural systems is studied and analyzed quantitatively.

ARC 511

Structural Design

Professor/Instructor

Nat Oppenheimer

Analysis and design of structural systems, including frames, arches, plates, and shells. Primarily, it considers reinforced concrete, prestressed concrete, and structural steel. Structural behavior is studied and analyzed by means of small-scale models. The design and construction of existing major structures are analyzed in some detail.

ARC 514

The Environmental Engineering of Buildings, Part I

Professor/Instructor

Mahadev Raman

A study of the needs and means of environmental control in buildings and urban developments, including environmental control systems and equipment in relation to structural and other components of construction. Either course may be offered either term.

ARC 515

The Environmental Engineering of Buildings, Part II

Professor/Instructor

Mahadev Raman

A study of the needs and means of environmental control in buildings and urban developments, including environmental control systems and equipment in relation to structural and other components of construction. Either course may be offered either term.

ARC 525 / ART 524

Mapping the City: Cities and Cinema

Professor/Instructor

M. Christine Boyer

This course examines the relationship between two forms of mapping the city: cinematic representations of urban space and architectural representations of urban form. It questions how shifts in urban form and plans for development or reconstruction give rise to cinematic representations. Required viewing of films every week in addition to required readings. Project on the general theme of mapping the city through cinema utilizing materials from films, urban texts, and readings.

ARC 526

Research in Urbanism

Professor/Instructor

M. Christine Boyer

Topics in the research or urbanism.

WWS 533 / ARC 535

Planning Theory and Process

Professor/Instructor

David N. Kinsey

Introduces planning theory, history, and practice. Examines urban, suburban, and regional planning processes, emphasizing the United States and Europe. Analyzes alternative planning models, issues such as ethics and social justice, and the diverse roles of public and private sector planners.

ARC 547

Introduction to Formal Analysis

Professor/Instructor

Cameron Wu

An introduction to critical methods and principles of architectural analysis considered through an in-depth investigation of historically significant buildings, landscapes, and urban spaces. Precedents are analyzed according to their underlying formal structure and spatial organization as well as in terms of the cultural and historical forces that helped shape their architectural form and meaning.

ARC 549 / ART 586

History and Theories of Architecture: 20th Century

Professor/Instructor

Spyros Papapetros

An overview of the major themes running through modern architecture in the twentieth century. The seminar is based on a close reading of selected buildings and texts both by prominent and less prominent figures of the modern movement and its aftermath. Special emphasis is given to the historiography and the history of reception of modern architecture, as well as the cultural, aesthetic and scientific theories that have informed modern architectural debates, including organicism, vitalism, functionalism, structuralism, historicism and their opposites.

ARC 550

Urbanism and the City of Modernity: 1870-1970

Professor/Instructor

M. Christine Boyer

Course will examine the field of urbanism through case studies which range from, for example, the city as pathological space and the definition of urbanism in 1870, to psychological space and the Metropolis c. 1900, to the functional space of the city of modernity and Neues Bauen, to ludic space and postwar urban trauma, to the space of information and the cybernetic city, and finally to the space of memory and the historic city. Students will be responsible for seminar discussions and for developing a research paper.