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Bringing people together as scientists to save a zebra species  
On Sept. 3, results were announced for the Great Grévy's Rally held in Kenya in January. The Princeton-sponsored event used 40,000 photos collected by 500 volunteers to precisely quantify the remaining wild population of the world's largest and most imperiled wild horse species, the Grévy's zebra. The initiative was among the first to use "citizen scientists" to establish the population and range of an endangered mammal. By Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications

Stoddard awarded the 2016 Dobzhansky Prize by the Society for the Study of Evolution.  
The Society for the Study of Evolution has awarded Mary (Cassie) Stoddard the 2016 Theodosius Dobzhansky Prize, which "recognizes the accomplishments and future promise of an outstanding young evolutionary biologist.” Stoddard delivered the Dobzhansky Prize Lecture at the SSE Meeting in Austin, Texas, in June.

Simon A. Levin wins National Medal of Science for unraveling ecological complexity  

Chitchat and small talk could serve an evolutionary need to bond with others  
Princeton University research suggests that idle conversation could be a social-bonding tool passed down from primates. The researchers found that lemurs use vocalizations far more selectively than previously thought, primarily exchanging calls with individuals with which they have close relationships. The findings could have implications for how scientists understand the evolution of primate vocalizations and human speech. By Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications

It takes a village: With camera and determination, Riehl studies communal nesting in birds  

Ants build 'living' bridges with their bodies, speak volumes about group intelligence  

Simon A. Levin Receives Honorary Doctorate of Science from McMaster University