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The 2015 Paris climate agreement sought to stabilize global temperatures by limiting warming to “well below 2.0 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels,” but a recent literature review found the 2 degree limitation “inadequate” and concluded that limiting global warming to no more than 1.5 degrees would “come with several advantages.”
Have you ever wished you could travel inside a rock? It may sound more like the Magic School Bus than science, but Princeton scientists have found a way to make it (almost) true.  With an industrial grinder and a super-high-resolution camera, Princeton geoscientists Adam Maloof and Akshay Mehra can deconstruct rock samples and create three-dimensional digital versions that scientists can look at from any angle.
The Witwatersrand Basin in southern Africa began as a shallow sea about 3 billion years ago. Scientists analyze this water to learn how microbes make a living when trapped kilometers beneath the surface. DCO Deep Energy and Deep Life Community members: Thomas Kieft (NMT), Verena Heuer (UNI-Bremen), Esta van Heerden (UFS), Barbara Sherwood Lollar (UToronto), and Maggie C.Y. Lau and Tullis Onstott (Princeton) investigated the organic matter in fracture waters to find clues to how they survive.
Climatologists are often asked, “Is climate change making hurricanes stronger?” but they can’t give a definitive answer because the global hurricane record only goes back to the dawn of the satellite era. But now, an intersection of disciplines — seismology, atmospheric sciences and oceanography — offers an untapped data source: the seismic record, which dates back to the early 20th century.
Join Wagner Free Institute of Science in Philadelphia for a hands-on, Ice Age-themed day of activities, scavenger hunts and demonstrations that teach about a fascinating period of Earth’s history. During the afternoon, geochemist Prof. John A. Higgins will be in their historic lecture hall presenting his research team's recent ice core studies in Antarctica and what they tell us about the Ice Age. Register ahead.
It is our pleasure to announce a new informal seminar series focused on climate research. The Climate Seminars are scheduled biweekly on Mondays, 4:00-5:00 p.m., in Guyot Hall, Room 220.
Congratulations to AOS Graduate Student Jane Baldwin, a PEI-STEP fellow, who was awarded an Outstanding Student Presentation Award at AGU's Fall Meeting in December for her presentation on the research she's conducting under the fellowship.
With deep sadness for all, the University posted the obituary of GEO Emeritus Kenneth Deffeyes, professor of geosciences, at Princeton University, who died on Nov. 29, 2017, in La Jolla, California. He was 85. Deffeyes was widely trained as a geological engineer, chemical oceanographer and sedimentary petrologist. He joined the Princeton faculty in 1967 and transferred to emeritus status in 1998.
In the American West, the anticipated water supply from snowpack — the high-elevation reservoir of snow that melts in the spring and summer — determines what, when and where farmers plant, and it helps urban water managers plan for the coming year’s water needs.
Professor Frederik Simons will be presenting a lecture titled "Mapping
the Earth's Interior with a Fleet of Floating Seismic Robots" at the
Houston Museum of Natural Science on January, 30, 2018 starting at 6:30 PM.