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A Princeton University Grand Challenges research team has created a model to evaluate how a human response to climate change may alter the agricultural utility of land.
Princeton University research examined the effects of bird-song recordings known as "playbacks" on birds in the wild. Used by birdwatchers to draw reclusive birds out of their hideaways, the playbacks could have potentially negative consequences, especially in terms of diverting a bird's energy from essential tasks such as tending to its nest. The research is out of the lab of David Wilcove, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and public affairs.
A proposal from an interdisciplinary group of Princeton faculty has been selected by the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS) executive committee to become the first PIIRS research community to receive funding under an initiative announced earlier this year.
The paper Climate change: helping nature survive the human response, published in the scientific journal Conservation Letters, looks at efforts to both reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and potential action that could be taken by people to adapt to a changed climate and assesses the potential impact that these could have on global ecosystems.
Despite the challenges and shortcomings, Bhutan's way of conserving the environment and wildlife is worth appreciating, according to participants attending an international conference in Bumthang on “Wildlife research techniques in rugged mountainous Asian landscape” which ended yesterday.
Effective Feb. 1, 2010, Lars Hedin, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, will assume the role of Director, Program in Environmental Studies (ENV) at Princeton Environmental Institute.
Since childhood, junior Jason Baum has been aware of environmental issues, switching off lights when leaving a room and turning off the water while brushing his teeth.
In his new book, "The Princeton Guide to Ecology," Princeton professor Simon Levin has tapped more than 130 experts to compile a concise, authoritative one-volume reference to the major subjects and concepts in ecology.
Grand Challenges collaborations focus on development, energy, health solutions.
Ask Princeton ecologist David Wilcove about the largest threat to the greatest number of species in the next 25 years, and he'll give you a two-word answer. Global warming? No, oil palm.
David Wilcove, one of world's leading experts on endangered species, discusses his new book, No Way Home, which chronicles the decline of the world's animal migrations.
The paper Climate change: helping nature survive the human response, published in the scientific journal Conservation Letters, looks at efforts to both reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and potential action that could be taken by people to adapt to a changed climate and assesses the potential impact that these could have on global ecosystems.
David Wilcove, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Public Affairs, has been named a recipient of the 2011 Pioneers of Science Award.
David Wilcove has been named a 2011 Pioneers of Science Award recipient by the Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute (HWI).