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A Princeton University-based study funded by the Carbon Mitigation Initiative found that a unique dynamic between trees and carbo-loading rhizobia bacteria may determine how well tropical forests absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.
In the early afternoon of June 3rd, students gathered together with family, friends, faculty, and staff to celebrate Class Day at the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) where 49 graduating seniors from 16 different departments were awarded Environmental Certificates. 49 Graduating seniors from 16 different departments were awarded Certificates in Environmental Studies. (Photo by PEI Staff) Lars Hedin, director of Princeton University's Program in Environmental Studies (ENV)
At no time has it been more important to envision how science informs the approach to global problems, especially those in the environmental arena, from changes in climate and weather extremes to the health of oceans, food security, and more.
Using a unique half century of data, scientists have determined that a combination of anthropogenic climate change, nitrogen pollution, severe storms, and heavy logging interacted in a complex way to impact the inner workings of contemporary forests in north eastern United States.
A new paper by researchers from the University of Georgia and Princeton University sheds light on the critical part played by a little-studied element, molybdenum, in the nutrient cycles of tropical forests.
Waterways in remote, pristine tropical forests located in the Caribbean and Central America contain levels of nitrogen comparable to amounts found in streams and rivers flowing through polluted forests in the United States and Europe.
The Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) has announced $1.1 million in new awards to support climate and energy research at Princeton University.
The Morris K. Udall Scholarship aims to attract students into careers in environmental public policy.
This course is an introduction to the study of environmental systems. Students will use quantitative analysis to examine three of today's most pressing issues: energy, water, and food.
At PEI's class day in June, 44 students graduating with certificates in Environmental Studies gathered with faculty and family to celebrate.
In a collaboration melding art with science, climate researchers and other members of the Princeton University community joined forces with The Civilians to help create a work-in-progress about global climate change.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
While exploring the Panama Canal in a small tourist boat, Steve Cosson and Michael Friedman were startled by a massive container ship suddenly passing by, rocking them violently in its wake. Painted on the hull in Chinese characters, its name was boldly inscribed as "The Great Immensity."
Recently, an analysis of Essential Science IndicatorsSM from Thomson Reuters recognized the work of Dr. Lars Hedin as having the highest percent increase in total citations in the field of Environment & Ecology.
Effective Feb. 1, 2010, Lars Hedin, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, will assume the role of Director, Program in Environmental Studies (ENV) at Princeton Environmental Institute.
The recipients, Craig Arnold, Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Lars Hedin, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, will receive funding for projects that will be integrated teaching and research initiatives within the Siebel Energy Grand Challenge.
A team of researchers led by Princeton University scientists has found for the first time that tropical rainforests, a vital part of the Earth's ecosystem, rely on the rare trace element molybdenum to capture the nitrogen fertilizer needed to support their wildly productive growth.
Ask Princeton ecologist David Wilcove about the largest threat to the greatest number of species in the next 25 years, and he'll give you a two-word answer. Global warming? No, oil palm.