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Jorge Sarmiento and Daniel Sigman are among Princeton researchers pushing through the challenging conditions of the Southern Ocean because they want to learn more about the waters at the bottom of the globe.
Enhanced growth of Earth's leafy greens during the 20th century has significantly slowed the planet's transition to being red-hot, according to a new research study supported by the Princeton Carbon Mitigation Initiative.
On October 4, 2013, the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) held its sixth annual Summer of Learning (SOL) Symposium.
The Grand Challenges Program has awarded three New Investigator Grants for 2013-2014. The awards support innovative mentorship of undergraduates working on multidisciplinary aspects of global climate change. Two of the supported projects will allow undergraduates to address issues at the interface of climate and oceans. Jorge Sarmiento, professor of geosciences, will mentor students working on Southern Ocean observations and modeling, arranging for them to work directly wit­­­h his g
The market for alternative energy technologies shows many areas of promise but also is beset by major uncertainties over regulation and tax policy.
As the flurry of the spring semester winds down with term papers written, exams taken, and graduations and reunions commemorated, it is a time for celebration, reflection, and new beginnings.
Guyot Hall, Room 10 became a sea of orange and black on June 4th as nearly 200 guests arrived for the welcome and presentation of prizes at PEI’s Class Day celebration for the Program in Environmental Studies.
Princeton University has one of the most extensive and capable investments in climate science of any institution, suggests Stephen Pacala.
The environmental challenges facing the world today are so vast that any solution will have tremendous social and environmental impacts.
In 2004, physicist Robert Socolow and ecologist Stephen Pacala, co-directors of the Carbon Mitigation Initiative at Princeton University, published a now-famous paper in Science.
A proposal from an interdisciplinary group of Princeton faculty has been selected by the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS) executive committee to become the first PIIRS research community to receive funding under an initiative announced earlier this year.
Inside we share exciting stories that reflect the innovative and transformative work being done by our enterprising group of faculty, staff, students and alumni.
Robert Socolow, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, has received the Keystone Award for Leadership in the Environment.
Two members of the Princeton University faculty have been recognized for major contributions to ecological research.
As soon as it became clear that the Deepwater Horizon oil eruption was going to be gushing for a while, anyone with a basic understanding of regional ocean currents, from sea captains to oceanographers, began to wonder: what will happen if the oil gets into the Loop Current?
This has been one of PEI's most enterprising years. We are pleased to share our exciting news with faculty, students, staff, alumni and friends.
In a collaboration melding art with science, climate researchers and other members of the Princeton University community joined forces with The Civilians to help create a work-in-progress about global climate change.
While exploring the Panama Canal in a small tourist boat, Steve Cosson and Michael Friedman were startled by a massive container ship suddenly passing by, rocking them violently in its wake. Painted on the hull in Chinese characters, its name was boldly inscribed as "The Great Immensity."
PEI Research and Center News from Spring/Summer 2010.
Princeton senior Ruth Metzel has been awarded the University's Henry Richardson Labouisse '26 Prize, which will fund her work with a nongovernmental organization to help address environmental issues in Panama.
Participants shared research findings in climate science, carbon capture and storage and policy from the past year and discussed prospects of future domestic and international climate policy.
At PEI we are approaching 2010 with a fresh sense of optimism. The Institute is strong and vital, as this issue of PEI News clearly illustrates.
Regarding his plans for the Oil, Energy and Middle East Initiative, teaching and research.
On June 1, 2009, PEI held it's 15th annual Class Day celebration.
The question is a potential deal-killer: If nations ever agree to slash greenhouse gas emissions, how will the world know if they live up to their pledges?
Biofuels derived from renewable sources can be produced in large quantities and address many problems related to fossil fuels, including greenhouse gas emissions, but only if they are made from certain sources, according to a new article by a team of scientists and policy experts that included several Princeton researchers.
Just months before world leaders are scheduled to meet to devise a new international treaty on climate change, a research team led by Princeton University scientists has developed a new way of dividing responsibility for carbon emissions among countries.
Energy company BP has committed to a five-year renewal of a joint research partnership with Princeton University that identifies ways of tackling the world's climate problem.
In one corridor, a faculty member was having an animated discussion on the future of the oil supply with two students. At a table, a Dining Services staff member was helping a local high school student with a project on recycling. Behind a bicycle that powered a light bulb, a student organization officer was signing up a new member.
A gift from Currie and Thomas A. Barron, a 1974 alumnus, offers new support for work at the intersection of environmental issues and the humanities at Princeton University.
A conference on environmental justice scheduled for Monday and Tuesday, April 28-29, will cap a yearlong collaboration between the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the Center for African American Studies that has enabled Princeton students and scholars to thoroughly explore the topic.
Snorkeling practice in DeNunzio Pool may be an unusual activity for a freshman seminar, unless the class is going to the Sargasso Sea.
Humanity can't go on like this. Earth's climate is shifting, and it is all but certainly civilization's fault for burning fossil fuels and spewing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
On his blog "Dot Earth," Andrew Revkin discusses "Wedges Reaffirmed," an article written by PEI's Robert Socolow and published by The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists and Climate Central.