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Course Offerings

Fall 2016-2017

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES COURSES

LAS 371 / SPA 372
Cuban History, Politics and Culture
This seminar constitutes an introduction to the study of Cuba from a historical perspective. During the first half of the semester the course follows a chronological approach, covering the political and socioeconomic development of the country from the sixteenth century to the present. In the second half of the semester, it examines a series of sociocultural issues that are central to the life of contemporary Cubans, on the island and abroad. At the core of the class lies an interrogation of the relevance of the Cuban case for larger discussions on colonialism, modernity, socialism and development. Other information: Use of electronic devices in the classroom requires the approval of the instructor. If pursuing a certificate in Spanish, students will be required to complete all written assignments in Spanish.
Adrián López-Denis. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm M.

LAS 372 / SPA 373 / GHP 372
Public Health and Private Healing in the Atlantic World
This seminar explores the impact of transatlantic exchanges between Europe, Africa and the Americas on the development of the environmental, political and sociocultural trends that affect our health and our ability to heal today. During the first half of the semester we will reconstruct the interconnected histories of the medicalization of the West and the westernization of the Rest, from the Renaissance to the end of the twentieth century. In the second half of the semester we will explore the contemporary consequences of these historical developments. Other information: Use of electronic devices in the classroom requires the approval of the instructor. If pursuing a certificate in Spanish, students will be required to complete all written assignments in Spanish.
Adrián López-Denis. S01 7:30 pm - 10:20 pm W.

LAS 375 / SPA 375
Cuban Cinema and Literature under an Authoritarian Regime: 1960-2010
An overview of Cuban cinema since the beginnings of the national film industry - and the start of censorship - until the proliferation of today's independent and oppositional films. There will be a parallel discussion of literature during the same period, emphasizing individual attitudes ranging from rebellion to publishing abroad. We will discuss the self-representation of political power and the image of contemporary Cuba constructed in recent films. Other information: Class will be taught in Spanish; discussion will be held in Spanish. Open to undergraduate and graduate students.
Antonio José Ponte. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm W.

LAS 506 / ARC 582 / COM 506 / SPA 598
Displaying Latin America
Exhibitions are central to the history of architecture. The modern architecture of Latin America made its international debut with several national pavilions in the 1939 New York World's Fair, the most famous being that of Brazil, as part of cultural and economic policies that addressed the need to be part of a modern world. This seminar studies multiple sites and strategies of displaying Latin America through architecture. It examines the cultural institutions (museums, ministries, universities, biennials) and engages the actors (architects, historians, cultural impresarios) that mobilized architecture to imagine the nation and the region. Other Information: Students will have an in-class presentation and a final research paper. Class will be conducted in English. Open to graduate and undergraduate students.
Patricio del Real . S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm M.

CROSS-LISTED COURSES

ARC 571 / ART 581 / MOD 573 / LAS 571
Research in Architecture
This advanced pro-seminar explores architectural research techniques through collaborative investigation of a specific issue facing the field. Rather than study research methods in the abstract, students are asked to actively carry out detailed research in teams and reflect upon its limits and potentials. The research project of each semester is carried through to realization in the form of a book, a conference, or an exhibition organized by the students in subsequent semesters. Other Requirements: Open to Graduate Students Only.
Beatriz Colomina . S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm Th.

CEE 463 / LAS 463
A Social and Multi-Dimensional Exploration of Structures
The class has pedagogical objectives related to the spatial relations of dimensions and time (sustainability and society). It develops the students' skills in drawing, model making, writing, oral communication, and advanced engineering analysis. The course is focused on a study of one theme that changes every year. Within each theme engineering calculations of designs will be made through advanced analyses. The social context will be studied, a site visit will be made during break week, models of a few significant works will be created and placed on display as part of a small exhibition. Two three-hour studios per week with lectures included. Other Requirements: Open to CEE Concentrators Only. Other information: Most of the class will involve students working independently in the studio, though we plan to have about 1 to 2 hours of lectures and discussions per week.
Maria E. Garlock, Branko Glisic. U01 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm M W; U01 9:00 am - 11:50 am.

HIS 303 / LAS 305
Colonial Latin America to 1810
This course begins with the origins and consolidation of the Aztec, Inca and Iberian polities and ends with the severance of colonial ties. It combines an overview of the political economy of the region over three centuries with a study of how social groups interacted among themselves and with imperial rule over time through accommodation and conflict. We pay special attention to comparisons and contrasts -- centers and frontiers of settlement, urban and rural life, indigenous and African populations, religion and transgression, Portuguese and Spanish models of rule -- and to long-term processes and implications of environmental change.
Vera S. Candiani . L01 11:00 am - 11:50 am T Th; P01 10:00 am - 10:50 am Th; P99 TBA.

POL 367 / LAS 367
Latin American Politics
This is an introductory course to Latin American politics. It studies the main puzzles that the literature has addressed concerning the region's historical political developments, the main theoretical and empirical approaches from which those puzzles have been addressed, and the concepts that have been applied to explain them. We will critically analyze basic political science concepts, such as inequality, development, liberalism, oligarchy, democratic contestation and participation, populism, corporatism, authoritarianism, political violence, constitutionalism, social movements, political identities, institutional strength, the rule of law.
Maria Paula Saffon Sanin . L01 3:30 pm - 4:20 pm T Th; P99 TBA.

POR 562 / SPA 600 / LAS 561
Luso-Brazilian Seminar - The Subject in Disguise
Focusing on fiction, poetry, diaries and documentary film, this seminar explores how the "I" who remembers is always a relentless and elusive disguise. From autobiographical contemporary experiments on memory and narrative to early 20th-century novels, we see how the storyteller is comprehensible only when the fictional transformation of him or herself is put into effect. Other Requirements: Not Open to Freshmen. Other information: Films by Andrés Di Tella, Flavia Castro, Patricio Guzmán, João Moreira Salles, Eduardo Coutinho, Carlos Nader, and Sandra Kogut. Seminar will be conducted in Portuguese, though discussions can be held in Portuguese, English or Spanish.
Pedro Meira Monteiro, Lilia K. Moritz Schwarcz. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm W.

REL 378 / GSS 378 / LAS 379
Religion, Gender, and Sexuality in Early Latin America
This seminar explores scholarship on the history of religion, gender, and sexuality in Latin America, focusing primarily on the mainland colonial period (1492-1821), but including some pre-colonial and the nineteenth century material. Through historical studies, primary documents, and discussion, students will consider connections between religious beliefs, spiritual and sexual practices, gendered social relations, and the ways race, class, and gender intersected with ideas about moral and social order in the period under study. We will also think critically about how scholars have portrayed these subjects.
Jessica Delgado. S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm W.

SOC 210 / LAS 210 / URB 210 / LAO 210
Urban Sociology: The City and Social Change in the Americas
By taking a comparative approach, this course examines the role of social, economic, and political factors in the emergence and transformation of modern cities in the United States and selected areas of Latin America. We consider the city in its dual image: both as a center of progress and as a redoubt of social problems, especially poverty. Attention is given to spatial processes that have resulted in the aggregation and desegregation of populations differentiated by social class and race.
Patricia Fernández-Kelly. L01 10:00 am - 10:50 am M W; P99 TBA.

SPA 222 / LAS 222 / LAO 222
Introduction to Latin American Cultures
An introduction to Latin American cultures and its symbolic and political configurations through a wide spectrum of materials (essays, film, art, photography, fiction). Students will study relevant issues in Latin American cultural, political, and social history, including the legacy of European colonialism, national fictions, modernity, memory, and gender politics. Among others, we will analyze and discuss works by Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, Patricio Guzmán and Claudia Llosa, Gabriel García Márquez and Pablo Neruda, and Frida Kahlo and Rosangela Rennô.
Other Requirements: Not Open to Seniors. Prerequisites and Restrictions: SPA 207 or higher, or instructor's permission.
Other information: Course taught in Spanish
Maria Gabriela Nouzeilles, Course Head; Staff . L01 11:00 am - 12:20 pm T; P01 11:00 am - 12:20 pm Th; P02 11:00 am - 12:20 pm Th.

SPA 231 / LAS 231
Masterpieces of Latin American Literature
An overview of Latin American literary masterpieces in the twentieth century. We will focus on the period of the Latin American boom in the 1960s, and discuss how novelists responded to political events in the region that include: the Cold War, the Cuban Revolution, the Central American wars, the military dictatorships in Argentina and Chile, etc. Authors studied will include: Jorge Luis Borges, Gabriel García Márquez, Isabel Allende, Mario Vargas Llosa, Gabriela Mistral, Juan Rulfo, Pablo Neruda, Reinaldo Arenas, Julio Cortázar. Other information: Course taught in Spanish
Rubén Gallo, Course Head; Staff . L01 11:00 am - 12:20 pm T P01 11:00 am - 12:20 pm Th; P02 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm T.

SPA 232 / LAS 232
Civilization and Barbarism
In Latin American literature, the opposition between civilization and barbarism has defined America since its "discovery" by Columbus. With a focus on the intersections of time, space, language and violence in seminal texts, we look at ways their authors position the Americas and their peoples in universal history. We will also consider the role of the public intellectual and writer as political figure and founder of new national movements. Authors include Columbus, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Teresa de Mier, Sarmiento, Martí, Darío, Vallejo, Borges, Arguedas, Vargas Llosa, and Bolaño.
Prerequisites and Restrictions: One 200-level SPA course or instructor's permission. Other information: Course taught in Spanish.
Staff . S01 11:00 am - 12:20 pm M W.

SPA 350 / LAS 349
Topics in Latin American Cultural Studies - Invaders as Ancestors, Gods and Vampires
Familiar and unfamiliar beings, under the guise of gods, ancestors or vampire-like creatures, dominate representations of conquest and invasion. Drawing on texts by indigenous and Spanish authors alike, we examine the reception of these mythic beings and their place in historical narratives of the conquest of Mexico, the American Southwest, and the Andes. Prerequisites and Restrictions: A 200-level SPA course above SPA 209 or instructor's permission. Other information: Course will be taught in Spanish.
Staff . S01 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm M W.

SPA 351 / LAS 347
Topics in the Culture of Cities - Havana
An introduction to Havana's urban culture through literature, architecture, art, film, and history, with special emphasis on the ways in which the capital has developed after the 1959 Revolution. Topics to be discussed include: ruins, the Soviet legacy, Americanism and anti-Americanism, cold war sites, socialist vs. capitalist spaces, performance and the new Cuban art, sexuality and race. The course will also consider the impact of the normalization of diplomatic relations with the U.S. on the capital. Prerequisites and Restrictions: SPA 207 or higher. Other information: Course conducted in Spanish. Readings in Spanish and English. Course will be co-taught by Antonio José Ponte, one of the most distinguished Cuban writers working today.
Rubén Gallo, Antonio José Ponte.
S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm Th.

COURSES OF INTEREST

SOC 317
Race and Ethnicity in Global Comparative Perspective
In this course, we focus not on ethnoracial groups, but on particular cases which illustrate how race is used as a means to divide, sort, and rank human beings. Readings include sociological, historical, and anthropological studies of ethnoracial dynamics in the U.S., Latin America, Africa, Asia, and Europe. We examine key conceptual and epistemological issues in comparative research on race; and compare how different societies have constructed ethnoracial boundaries. We conclude by considering the possible future(s) of the U.S. racial order by discussing ethnoracial attitudes, multiraciality, immigration, and 'Latin Americanization.' Other information: Other 25% = Reflection memos are worth 25% of the final grade. [ NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Staff . S01 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm T.

SOC 560
Topics in Social Stratification (Half-Term) - Race & Ethnicity in Global Comparative Perspective
In this course, we focus not on ethnoracial groups, but on particular cases which illustrate how race is used as a means to divide, sort, and rank human beings. Readings include sociological, historical, and anthropological studies of ethnoracial dynamics in the U.S., Latin America, Africa, Asia, and Europe. We examine key conceptual and epistemological issues in comparative research on race; and compare how different societies have constructed ethnoracial boundaries. We conclude by considering the possible future(s) of the U.S. racial order by discussing ethnoracial attitudes, multiraciality, immigration, and 'Latin Americanization.' Other Requirements: Open to Graduate Students Only. Other information: This course meets from 09/15/16 to 10/20/16. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Staff. S01 1:30 pm - 4:30 pm Th.

SPA 224
Hispanic Studies: Introduction to Cultural Analysis
An introduction to the analysis of contemporary cultural texts (narrative, poetry, film, photography) from Latin America and Spain, with the support of various theoretical ideas. The course's main objective is to provide students with a set of strong conceptual, analytical and linguistic skills, which will be of great help in 300-level literature/culture courses.  Other Requirements: Not Open to Seniors. Prerequisites and Restrictions: Another SPA 200-level course or instructor's permission. Other information: At least one of the classes will be held in the Princeton University Art Museum to examine some of the museum's holdings of Latin American photographs. Any student unable to register for the course, please contact Prof. Loureiro, loureiro@princeton.edu. [NOTE: LAS Concentrators must write their final paper on a Latin American topic and provide a copy of the final paper to PLAS in order to receive certificate credit.]
Manuel-Angel G. Loureiro. C01 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm M W.

Course offerings in PDF format