Acanthocephala

related topics
{specie, animal, plant}
{disease, patient, cell}
{line, north, south}
{@card@, make, design}

Acanthocephala (Greek ακανθος, akanthos, thorn + κεφαλη, kephale, head) is a phylum of parasitic worms known as acanthocephales, thorny-headed worms, or spiny-headed worms, characterized by the presence of an evertable proboscis, armed with spines, which it uses to pierce and hold the gut wall of its host. Acanthocephalans typically have complex life cycles, involving a number of hosts, including invertebrates, fishes, amphibians, birds, and mammals. About 1150 species have been described.[citation needed]

The Acanthocephala were thought to be a discrete phylum. Recent genome analysis has shown that they are descended from, and should be considered as, highly modified rotifers.[2] This is an example of molecular phylogenetics.

Contents

Morphological characteristics

There are several morphological characteristics that distinguish acanthocephalans from other phyla of parasitic worms.

Full article ▸

related documents
Basidiomycota
Echinoderm
Zebra
Ivory-billed Woodpecker
Diplodocus
Boar
Barn Swallow
Allosaurus
Moa
Donkey
Inbreeding
Grebe
Galliformes
Giraffe
Llama
Velvet worm
Flea
Ficus
American Robin
Reptile
Evolutionary developmental biology
Komodo dragon
Parasitism
Amanita muscaria
Border Collie
Triticale
Lepidoptera
Caterpillar
Chimpanzee
Bonobo