Aioli

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Aioli (pronounced /aɪˈoʊli/; Provençal Occitan: alhòli IPA: [aˈʎɔli] [1], Catalan: allioli IPA: [ˌaʎiˈɔɫi]) is a sauce made of garlic and olive oil. Sometimes egg is also added for ease of mixing, but this is not considered traditional. There are many variations, such as the addition of mustard or, in Catalonia, pears. In Occitan cuisine, aioli is traditionally served with seafood, fish soup, and croutons, in a dish called merluça amb alhòli. In Catalan cuisine, it is traditionally served with grilled lamb, grilled vegetables, arròs negre and paella. In Malta, arjoli or ajjoli is commonly made with the addition of either crushed galletti or tomato. In the Occitan Valleys of Italy it is served with potatoes[2] boiled with salt and bay laurel. It is usually served at room temperature. The name aioli (alhòli) comes from Provençal alh 'garlic' (< Latin allium) + òli 'oil' (< Latin oleum).

Aioli is, like mayonnaise, an emulsion or a suspension of small globules of oil and oil soluble compounds in water and water soluble compounds. Egg yolk can be used as an emulsifier but mustard and garlic both have emulsion-producing properties. Classic aioli is made without egg, and the art is in getting it to blend well.

Contents

Traditional aioli

In Provence, aioli (or more formally, Le Grand Aïoli) also designates a complete dish consisting of various boiled vegetables (usually carrots, potatoes, and green beans), boiled fish (normally, desalted salt cod), and boiled eggs served with the aioli sauce.

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