Axon

related topics
{disease, patient, cell}
{math, energy, light}
{@card@, make, design}
{acid, form, water}
{specie, animal, plant}
{system, computer, user}
{work, book, publish}

An axon is a long, slender projection of a nerve cell, or neuron, that conducts electrical impulses away from the neuron's cell body or soma.

An axon is one of two types of protoplasmic protrusions that extrude from the cell body of a neuron, the other type being dendrites. Axons are distinguished from dendrites by several features, including shape (dendrites often taper while axons usually maintain a constant radius), length (dendrites are restricted to a small region around the cell body while axons can be much longer), and function (dendrites usually receive signals while axons usually transmit them). All of these rules have exceptions, however.

Some types of neurons have no axon—these are called amacrine cells, and transmit signals from their dendrites. No neuron ever has more than one axon; however in invertebrates such as insects the axon sometimes consists of several regions that function more or less independently of each other[citation needed]. Most axons branch, in some cases very profusely.

Axons make contact with other cells—usually other neurons but sometimes muscle or gland cells—at junctions called synapses. At a synapse, the membrane of the axon closely adjoins the membrane of the target cell, and special molecular structures serve to transmit electrical or electrochemical signals across the gap. Some synaptic junctions appear partway along an axon as it extends—these are called en passant ("in passing") synapses. Other synapses appear as terminals at the ends of axonal branches. A single axon, with all its branches taken together, can innervate multiple parts of the brain and generate thousands of synaptic terminals.

Contents

Anatomy

Axons are in effect the primary transmission lines of the nervous system, and as bundles they help make up nerves. Individual axons are microscopic in diameter (typically about 1μm across), but may be up to several feet in length. The longest axons in the human body, for example, are those of the sciatic nerve, which run from the base of the spine to the big toe of each foot. These single-cell fibers of the sciatic nerve may extend a meter or even longer.[1]

Full article ▸

related documents
Mumps
Acetylcholine
Cranial nerves
Anxiolytic
Glucose tolerance test
Central obesity
Endorphin
Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy
Erectile dysfunction
Antigen
Rickets
Transverse myelitis
Sildenafil
Small intestine
Diabetic ketoacidosis
Priapism
Poliomyelitis
Tubal ligation
Oncogene
Larynx
Catecholamines
Seasonal affective disorder
Ciclosporin
Occupational therapist
Paralysis
Hypomania
Q fever
Alkaptonuria
Artificial respiration
Peritoneum