BIND

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BIND (pronounced /ˈbaɪnd/), or named (/ˈneɪmdiː/), was as of 2004 the most commonly used Domain Name System (DNS) server on the Internet, and still proclaims itself to be so.[1] On Unix-like operating systems it is the de facto standard.

Originally written by four graduate students at the Computer Systems Research Group at the University of California, Berkeley (UCB), the name originates as an acronym from Berkeley Internet Name Domain,[2] reflecting the application's use within UCB. Today, the Internet Software Consortium refers to it as Berkeley Internet Name Daemon,[3] reflecting the function of the application as an operating system daemon.

BIND was first released with Berkeley Software Distribution 4.3BSD. Paul Vixie started maintaining it in 1988 while working for Digital Equipment Corporation. As of 2010, the Internet Systems Consortium maintains BIND.

A new version of BIND (BIND 9) was written by the ISC from scratch in part to address the architectural difficulties with auditing the earlier BIND code bases, and also to support DNSSEC (DNS Security Extensions). Other important features of BIND 9 include: TSIG, DNS notify, nsupdate, IPv6, rndc flush (remote name daemon control), views, multiprocessor support, and an improved portability architecture. rndc uses a shared secret to provide encryption for local and remote terminals during each session.

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