Boeing 767

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The Boeing 767 is a mid-size wide-body twin-engine airliner produced by Boeing Commercial Airplanes. Passenger versions of the 767 can carry between 181 and 375 passengers.[5] The first wide-body twinjet produced by Boeing, the 767 was conceived and designed in tandem with the narrow-body Boeing 757 twinjet. Both airliners share design features and flight decks, enabling pilots to obtain a common type rating to operate the two aircraft. The 767 was the first Boeing wide-body airliner to enter service with a two-person crew flight deck, eliminating the need for a flight engineer. Following in-service indications of its twinjet design reliability, the 767 received regulatory approval allowing extended transoceanic operations beginning in 1985.

The Boeing 767 versions have a range of 5,200 to 6,590 nautical miles (9,400 to 12,200 km) depending on variant and seating.[5] The 767 has been produced in three fuselage lengths. The original 767-200 first entered into airline service in 1982, followed by the 767-300 in 1986, and the 767-400ER in 2000. Extended range versions of the original -200 and -300 models, the 767-200ER and 767-300ER, have been produced with added payload and operating distance capability. The 767-300F, a freighter version, entered service in 1995.

Through the 1990s, the Boeing 767 became commonly used on medium- to long-haul routes, and the aircraft has ranked as the most commonly used airliner for transatlantic flights between the United States and Europe.[6] There have been over 1,000 Boeing 767s ordered with over 990 delivered as of 2010.[3] The -300/-300ER models are the most popular variants, accounting for approximately two-thirds of all 767s ordered.[7] There were 863 Boeing 767s in service with over 40 airlines as of July 2010.[8]

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