Camelopardalis

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Camelopardalis is a large but faint constellation in the northern sky. The constellation was first described by Jakob Bartsch in 1624, but was created earlier by Petrus Plancius. In older astronomy books, one will sometimes see an alternative spelling of the name as Camelopardus.

In Chinese astronomy, constellation Camelopardalis is lied in Purple Forbidden enclosure (紫微垣 Zǐ Wēi Yuán).

Contents

Etymology

First attested in English in 1785, the word camelopardalis comes from the Latin[1] and it is the romanisation of the Greek "καμηλοπάρδαλις" meaning "giraffe",[2] from "κάμηλος" (kamēlos), "camel"[3] + "πάρδαλις" (pardalis), "leopard",[4] due to its having a long neck like a camel and spots like a leopard.

Notable features

Stars

Although Camelopardalis is the 18th largest constellation, it is not a particularly bright constellation, as the brightest stars are only of fourth magnitude. β Camelopardalis is the brightest star, at apparent magnitude 4.03. This star is a double star, with components of magnitudes 4.0 and 7.4. The second brightest is CS Camelopardalis, which has neither a Bayer nor a Flamsteed designation. It is of magnitude 4.21 and is slightly variable. Other double stars interesting to amateurs are OΣ 67 Camelopardalis with a greenish companion, 19 Camelopardalis (probably an optical double), and Σ 1694 Camelopardalis (a blue and yellow optical double).[5] Other variable stars are U Camelopardalis, VZ Camelopardalis, and Mira variables T Camelopardalis, X Camelopardalis, and R Camelopardalis.[5]

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