Capybara

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The capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris [1][3][4]), also known as capibara, chigüire in Venezuela, Colombia, and Ecuador ronsoco in Peru, chigüiro, and carpincho in Spanish,[5][6][7] and capivara in Portuguese,[6] is the largest living rodent in the world.[8] Its closest relatives are agouti, chinchillas, coyphillas, and guinea pigs.[9] Its common name, derived from Kapiÿva in the Guarani language,[6] means "master of the grasses"[10] while its scientific name, both hydrochoerus and hydrochaeris, comes from Greek ὕδωρ (ýdor = water) + χοίρος (choiros = pig, hog).

Capybaras have heavy, barrel-shaped bodies and short heads with reddish-brown fur on the upper part of their body that turns yellowish-brown underneath. Adult capybaras may grow to 130 centimetres (4.3 ft) in length, and weigh up to 65 kg (140 lb).[11][12][13] The top recorded weight is 105.4 kg (232 lbs).[14] Capybaras have slightly webbed feet, no tail,[15] and 20 teeth.[16] Their back legs are slightly longer than their front legs and their muzzles are blunt with eyes, nostrils, and ears on top of their head.[15] Females are slightly heavier than males. Females: 36 to 66 kg (80 to 145 pounds). Males: 34 to 61 kilograms (75 to 135 pounds).

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