Carbon nanotube

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Part of a series of articles on

Nanomaterials

Carbon nanotubes
Buckminsterfullerene
Fullerene chemistry
Applications
In popular culture
Timeline
Carbon allotropes

Quantum dots
Nanostructures
Colloidal gold
Silver nanoparticles
Iron nanoparticles
Platinum nanoparticles

See also
Nanotechnology
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Carbon nanotubes (CNTs; also known as buckytubes), not to be confused with carbon fiber, are allotropes of carbon with a cylindrical nanostructure. Nanotubes have been constructed with length-to-diameter ratio of up to 132,000,000:1,[1] significantly larger than any other material. These cylindrical carbon molecules have novel properties, making them potentially useful in many applications in nanotechnology, electronics, optics, and other fields of materials science, as well as potential uses in architectural fields. They may also have applications in the construction of body armor. They exhibit extraordinary strength and unique electrical properties, and are efficient thermal conductors.

Nanotubes are members of the fullerene structural family, which also includes the spherical buckyballs. The ends of a nanotube may be capped with a hemisphere of the buckyball structure. Their name is derived from their size, since the diameter of a nanotube is on the order of a few nanometers (approximately 1/50,000th of the width of a human hair), while they can be up to 18 centimeters in length (as of 2010).[1] Nanotubes are categorized as single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs).

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