Carson bandwidth rule

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In telecommunication, Carson's bandwidth rule defines the approximate bandwidth requirements of communications system components for a carrier signal that is frequency modulated by a continuous or broad spectrum of frequencies rather than a single frequency. Carson's rule does not apply well when the modulating signal contains discontinuities, such as a square wave. Carson's rule originates from John Renshaw Carson's 1922 paper [1].

Carson's bandwidth rule is expressed by the relation CBR = 2(Δf + fm) where CBR is the bandwidth requirement, Δf is the peak frequency deviation, and fm is the highest frequency in the modulating signal.

For example, an FM signal with 5 kHz peak deviation, and a maximum audio frequency of 3 kHz, would require an approximate bandwidth 2(5+3) = 16 kHz.

Carson's bandwidth rule is often applied to transmitters, antennas, optical sources, receivers, photodetectors, and other communications system components.

Any modulated signal will have an infinite number of sidebands and hence an infinite bandwidth but in practice all significant sideband energy (98% or more) is concentrated within the bandwidth defined by Carson's rule. It is a useful approximation, but setting the arbitrary definition of occupied bandwidth at 98% of the power still means that the power outside the band is only about 17 dB less than the carrier inside 10\log\left(\frac{0.02}{0.98}\right), therefore Carson's Rule is of little use in spectrum planning.

References

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