Catford

related topics
{city, large, area}
{church, century, christian}
{build, building, house}
{film, series, show}
{line, north, south}
{@card@, make, design}
{car, race, vehicle}
{day, year, event}
{god, call, give}
{law, state, case}
{black, white, people}
{borough, population, unit_pref}
{group, member, jewish}
{food, make, wine}
{village, small, smallsup}

Coordinates: 51°26′43″N 0°01′15″W / 51.4452°N 0.0207°W / 51.4452; -0.0207

Catford is a district in south London, England, located in the London Borough of Lewisham. It is situated 6.3 miles (10.1 km) south-east of Charing Cross. The area is identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London.[1]

Contents

Architecture

The 1960s and 70s had a considerable impact on the architecture of Catford. The old Town Hall, 'the Catford Cathedral' of 1875, was replaced by the current Civic Suite in 1968, soon after the merger of the metropolitan boroughs of Lewisham and Deptford. Laurence House, where many of the borough's offices are housed, is on the site of St Laurence's Church. The brutalist Eros House, which replaced the Lewisham Hippodrome (Catford's music hall designed by the famous theatre architect Frank Matcham) in 1960, is now Grade II listed. Architecture critic Ian Nairn praised Eros House as:

A monster sat down in Catford and just what the place needed. No offence meant: this southward extension of Lewisham High Street badly wanted stiffening. Now there is a punchy concrete focus (`you know, that funny new building') both close to and at a distance, from the desolate heights of the Downham Estate, where it stands straight to the afternoon sun. Rough concrete is put through all its paces, front convex eaves on Sainsbury's to a staircase tower which is either afflicted with an astounding set of visual distortions or is actually leaning. Again, no offence meant. Unlike many other avant-garde buildings, particularly in the universities, this one is done from real conviction, not from a desire for self-advertisement. The gaunt honesty of those projecting concrete frames carrying boxed-out bow windows persists. It is not done at you and it transforms the surroundings instead of despising them. This most craggy and uncompromising of London buildings turns out to be full of firm gentleness.[2]

Full article ▸

related documents
Castries
Romford
Linz
Salzburg
Linköping
Darmstadt
Lausanne
Tapiola
Wandsworth
Greifswald
Bunbury, Western Australia
Cannes
Pyongyang
Accra
Leuven
Buxton
Camberwell
Hampstead
Santo Domingo
London Waterloo station
Ghent
Quad Cities
Montpellier
Traralgon, Victoria
Malmö
Transport in the Faroe Islands
Port-au-Prince
New Delhi
Klagenfurt
Samara, Russia