Cereal

related topics
{food, make, wine}
{island, water, area}
{company, market, business}
{specie, animal, plant}
{acid, form, water}
{rate, high, increase}
{country, population, people}
{area, community, home}

Cereals, grains, or cereal grains are grasses (members of the monocot families Poaceae or Gramineae)[1] cultivated for the edible components of their fruit seeds (botanically, a type of fruit called a caryopsis): the endosperm, germ, and bran. Cereal grains are grown in greater quantities and provide more food energy worldwide than any other type of crop; they are therefore staple crops.

In their natural form (as in whole grain), they are a rich source of vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, fats, oils, and protein. However, when refined by the removal of the bran and germ, the remaining endosperm is mostly carbohydrate and lacks the majority of the other nutrients. In some developing nations, grain in the form of rice, wheat, or maize (in American terminology, corn) constitutes a majority of daily sustenance. In developed nations, cereal consumption is moderate and varied but still substantial.

The word cereal derives from Ceres, the name of the Roman goddess of harvest and agriculture.

Contents

Production

The following table shows annual production of cereals, in 1961,[2] 2005, 2006, and 2007 ranked by 2007 production.[3] All but buckwheat and quinoa are true grasses (these two are pseudocereals).

Maize, wheat and rice together accounted for 87% of all grain production worldwide, and 43% of all food calories in 2003,[3] while the production of oats and rye have drastically fallen from their 1960s levels. Other grains that are important in some places, but that have little production globally (and are not included in FAO statistics), include:

Full article ▸

related documents
Persimmon
Soy sauce
Cigarette
Thai cuisine
Tempura
Pea soup
Sugar beet
Meat
Spam (food)
Capsicum
Dessert wine
Soul food
Ham
Stout
Poutine
Poultry
Mango
Porter (beer)
Mayonnaise
Matzo
Flour
Peach
Tapioca
Yeast
Sugar substitute
Ginger
Ketchup
Japanese cuisine
Almond
Cooking