ChatZilla

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ChatZilla is an IRC client for Mozilla-based browsers such as Firefox, introduced in 2000. It is cross-platform open source software which has been noted for its consistent appearance across platforms, CSS appearance customization and scripting.

Contents

Early history

On April 20, 1999, it was reported that Mozilla, at the time the open-source arm of AOL's Netscape Communications division, had announced the commencement of "an instant messaging and chat project with the stated goal of supporting a wide variety of chat protocols, including the venerable Internet Relay Chat." Other companies were also developing chat systems. "'We recognize that there's a lot of interest in the instant messaging space,' said AOL spokesperson Catherine Corre, referring to the Mozilla project. 'This is a recognition of the interest in that area.'"[2] At the time, the new chat client proposal was reported as being "competition" to AOL's own AOL Instant Messenger chat client, and on April 21, 1999, the announcement was rescinded "pending further review by Netscape."[3][4] Independently, programmer Robert Ginda developed an IRC client and submitted it to the Mozilla project, which as of September 1999 planned to introduce it with the planned release of Mozilla browser.[5] Named "ChatZilla," the client was available in development form in May 2000 for the Netscape 6.01 browser, and Mozilla 0.8.[6][7][8][9]

Features

ChatZilla runs on any platform on which a Mozilla-based browser can run, including Mac OS X, Linux, and Microsoft Windows, and provides a "consistent user interface across the board."[10] It can also be used as a standalone app using XULRunner.[11][12]

It contains most general features of IRC clients, including connecting to multiple servers at once, maintaining a built-in list of standard networks, searching and sorting of available channels, chat logging, Direct Client-to-Client ("DCC") chat and file transfers, and user customization of the interface.[13][9] ChatZilla includes automatic completion of nicknames with the Tab key, and appends a comma if the nickname is the first word on a line.[14] The text entry window can be "single line", in which the Enter key sends the composed text, or "multiline" in which allows composing larger text sections with line breaks, and the Ctrl-Enter key combo sends the text block.[15] JavaScript is used for running scripts[16] and messages are styled with CSS,[17] which can be altered by the user. DCC is supported which allows users to transfer files and chat directly between one another.[18]

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