Chemical vapor deposition

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Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a chemical process used to produce high-purity, high-performance solid materials. The process is often used in the semiconductor industry to produce thin films. In a typical CVD process, the wafer (substrate) is exposed to one or more volatile precursors, which react and/or decompose on the substrate surface to produce the desired deposit. Frequently, volatile by-products are also produced, which are removed by gas flow through the reaction chamber.

Microfabrication processes widely use CVD to deposit materials in various forms, including: monocrystalline, polycrystalline, amorphous, and epitaxial. These materials include: silicon, carbon fiber, carbon nanofibers, filaments, carbon nanotubes, SiO2, silicon-germanium, tungsten, silicon carbide, silicon nitride, silicon oxynitride, titanium nitride, and various high-k dielectrics. The CVD process is also used to produce synthetic diamonds.

Contents

Types of chemical vapor deposition

A number of forms of CVD are in wide use and are frequently referenced in the literature. These processes differ in the means by which chemical reactions are initiated (e.g., activation process) and process conditions.

  • Classified by operating pressure
    • Atmospheric pressure CVD (APCVD) - CVD processes at atmospheric pressure.
    • Low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) - CVD processes at subatmospheric pressures[1]. Reduced pressures tend to reduce unwanted gas-phase reactions and improve film uniformity across the wafer. Most modern CVD processes are either LPCVD or UHVCVD.
    • Ultrahigh vacuum CVD (UHVCVD) - CVD processes at a very low pressure, typically below 10−6 Pa (~10−8 torr). Note that in other fields, a lower division between high and ultra-high vacuum is common, often 10−7 Pa.
  • Classified by physical characteristics of vapor
    • Aerosol assisted CVD (AACVD) - A CVD process in which the precursors are transported to the substrate by means of a liquid/gas aerosol, which can be generated ultrasonically. This technique is suitable for use with non-volatile precursors.
    • Direct liquid injection CVD (DLICVD) - A CVD process in which the precursors are in liquid form (liquid or solid dissolved in a convenient solvent). Liquid solutions are injected in a vaporization chamber towards injectors (typically car injectors). Then the precursor vapors are transported to the substrate as in classical CVD process. This technique is suitable for use on liquid or solid precursors. High growth rates can be reached using this technique.
  • Plasma methods (see also Plasma processing)
    • Microwave plasma-assisted CVD (MPCVD)
    • Plasma-Enhanced CVD (PECVD) - CVD processes that utilize plasma to enhance chemical reaction rates of the precursors[2]. PECVD processing allows deposition at lower temperatures, which is often critical in the manufacture of semiconductors.
    • Remote plasma-enhanced CVD (RPECVD) - Similar to PECVD except that the wafer substrate is not directly in the plasma discharge region. Removing the wafer from the plasma region allows processing temperatures down to room temperature.
  • Atomic layer CVD (ALCVD) – Deposits successive layers of different substances to produce layered, crystalline films. See Atomic layer epitaxy.
  • Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition (CCVD) - nGimat's proprietary Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition process is an open-atmosphere, flame-based technique for depositing high-quality thin films and nanomaterials.
  • Hot wire CVD (HWCVD) - also known as catalytic CVD (Cat-CVD) or hot filament CVD (HFCVD). Uses a hot filament to chemically decompose the source gases.[3]
  • Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) - CVD processes based on metalorganic precursors.
  • Hybrid Physical-Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) - Vapor deposition processes that involve both chemical decomposition of precursor gas and vaporization of a solid source.
  • Rapid thermal CVD (RTCVD) - CVD processes that use heating lamps or other methods to rapidly heat the wafer substrate. Heating only the substrate rather than the gas or chamber walls helps reduce unwanted gas phase reactions that can lead to particle formation.
  • Vapor phase epitaxy (VPE)

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