Cloacina

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In Roman mythology, Cloacina (derived from the Latin word "cloaca" meaning "sewer" or "drain") was the goddess who presided over the Cloaca Maxima, the system of sewers in Rome. The Cloaca Maxima was a sewer said to be begun by Tarquinius Priscus and finished by Tarquinius Superbus. Titus Tatius, who reigned with Romulus, erected a statue to her. She was originally derived from Etruscan mythology. As well as controlling sewers, she was also a protector of sexual intercourse in marriage. Regardless of her original source, she later became identified with Venus.

Worship

Cloacina was worshipped as an aspect of Venus at the small Shrine of Venus Cloacina, situated before the Basilica Aemilia on the Roman Forum and directly above the Cloaca Maxima. Some Roman coins had images of Cloacina or her shrine on them. Cloacina was also worshipped with rhymed prayer.[citation needed]

References


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