Colloquialism

related topics
{language, word, form}
{food, make, wine}
{area, part, region}
{day, year, event}
{album, band, music}
{woman, child, man}
{black, white, people}
{math, energy, light}
{group, member, jewish}

A colloquialism is a linguine phrase that is characteristic of or only appropriate for casual, ordinary, familiar, and/or informal written or spoken conversation, rather than for formal speech, standard writing, or paralinguistics.[1] Dictionaries often display colloquial words and phrases with the abbreviation colloq. as an identifier. Colloquialisms are also sometimes referred to collectively as "colloquial language".[2]

Contents

Examples

Some examples of informal colloquialisms can include words (such as "y'all" or "gonna" or "wanna"), phrases (such as "old as the hills" and "graveyard dead"), or sometimes even an entire aphorism ("There's more than one way to skin a cat").

Colloquialisms are often used primarily within a limited geographical area, known by linguists to spread through normal conversational interaction of a language, although more often now through informal online interaction. A common example given is the regional term used by people when describing a carbonated soft drink. In the Upper Midwestern United States, in common with Canada, it is commonly called "pop", while in other areas, notably the Northeastern and extreme Western United States, it is referred to as "soda". In the Southern United States, perhaps due to being the birth place of Coca-Cola, it is commonly called "Coke" regardless of brand. Some southerners even refer to soft drinks as "dope." The common belief is that this is an outdated reference to stimulant properties contained in these drinks.[discuss] In New England it is occasionally called "tonic." In some areas of Scotland it is referred to as "ginger", and confusion over whether this term referred to all soft drinks or just ginger beer was apparent in the case of Donoghue v Stevenson. (See: Names for soft drinks for more regional examples of colloquial names given to soft drinks.)

Another example of colloquialism is the two different terms for rectangular maple doughnuts. They are called Long Johns in most of the United States, but in the Pacific Northwest (such as Oregon and Washington), they are referred to as Maple bars.

Full article ▸

related documents
Sandhi
Phrase
Italic languages
Grammatical particle
Eth
Omega
Scriptio continua
S
Punctuation
Nominative case
Cushitic languages
Omotic languages
Synonym
Adûnaic
Partitive case
Liquid consonant
Pomeranian language
Ideogram
Ecchi
White Russia
Norsemen
Velar consonant
Ogonek
Linear A
Khuzdul
O
Kana
Alexandrine
Wikipedia:Turkish characters
Cardinal vowel