Cumin

related topics
{food, make, wine}
{language, word, form}
{god, call, give}
{land, century, early}
{country, population, people}
{woman, child, man}

Cumin (Cuminum cyminum, pronounced /ˈkjuːmɨn/ or UK: /ˈkʌmɨn/, US: /ˈkuːmɨn/, and sometimes spelled cummin) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native from the east Mediterranean to East India. Its seeds, in ground form, are used in the cuisines of many different cultures.

Contents

Etymology

The English "cumin" derives from the Old English "cymen" (or Old French "cumin"), from Latin "cuminum",[2] which is the romanization of the Greek "κύμινον" (kuminon),[3] cognate with Hebrew kammon, Arabic kammun.[4] Forms of this word are attested in several ancient Semitic languages, including kamūnu in Akkadian.[5] The ultimate source is the Sumerian word gamun.[6] The earliest attested form of the word κύμινον (kuminon) is the Mycenaean Greek ku-mi-no, written in Linear B syllabic script.[7]

Full article ▸

related documents
Tzatziki
Marmalade
Gravy
Yorkshire pudding
Vietnamese cuisine
Berry
Perry
Calvados (spirit)
Cantaloupe
Marsala wine
Buffalo wings
Bay leaf
Chiuchow cuisine
Submarine sandwich
Aioli
Bentō
Edamame
Papaya
Onigiri
Hunan cuisine
Caffè
Malt
Tonkatsu
Maraschino cherry
Gazpacho
Cocktail
Chop suey
Steak
Nori
Paella