Cyanoacrylate

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Cyanoacrylate is the generic name for cyanoacrylate based fast-acting adhesives such as methyl 2-cyanoacrylate, ethyl-2-cyanoacrylate (commonly sold under trade names like SuperGlue and Krazy Glue), and n-butyl cyanoacrylate (used in the veterinary glues Vetbond and LiquiVet and skin glues like Xoin, Indermil, LiquiBand® and Histoacryl). 2-octyl cyanoacrylate is a medical grade glue encountered under various trade names; e.g., derma+flex® QS™, SurgiSeal, Octylseal, FloraSeal, Dermabond, Surgi-Lock and Nexaband. This was developed to be non-toxic and less irritating to skin tissue. Cyanoacrylate adhesives are sometimes known as "instant glues". The abbreviation "CA" is commonly used for industrial grades.

Contents

Uses

Cyanoacrylate is a tenacious adhesive, particularly when used to bond non-porous materials or those that contain minute traces of water. It is also very good at bonding body tissue, and while this can be a bothersome (or even dangerous) side effect during everyday use, it has been exploited for the benefit of suture-free surgery.[citation needed]

Cyanoacrylate glue has a low shearing strength, which has also led to its use as a temporary adhesive in cases where the piece can easily be sheared off at a later time. Common examples include mounting a workpiece to a sacrificial glue block on a lathe, and tightening pins and bolts.[citation needed]

Cyanoacrylates are used to assemble prototype electronics (see wire wrap), flying model aircraft, and as retention dressings for nuts and bolts. Their effectiveness in bonding metal and general versatility have also made them popular amongst modeling and miniatures hobbyists. They are used to re-harden the boxes and shanks of ballerinas' pointe shoes as well.[citation needed]

Cyanoacrylate glue's ability to resist water has made it popular with marine aquarium hobbyists for fragging corals. The cut branches of hard corals such as Acropora can be glued to a piece of live rock (harvested reef coral) or Milliput (epoxy putty) to allow the new frag to grow out. In fact, it is actually safe to use directly in the tank, unlike silicone, which must be cured to be safe.[citation needed]

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