Daksha

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In Hinduism, Daksha, "the skilled one", is an ancient creator god, one of the Prajapatis [1], the Rishis and the Adityas. Daksha is said to be the son of Aditi and Brahma. (In another source, Daksha is said to be the father of Diti and Aditi, Kashyapa's wives and Sati's sisters).

With his wife Prasuti, he is the father of thirteen daughters, namely Aditi, Diti, Dānu, Kala, Danāyū, Sinhika, Krodha, Pradha, Viswa, Vinata, Kapila, Muni, and Kadru.[2] Many of whom were married to Soma. Daksha found that Soma overly favored one daughter (Rohini) over the others, thus neglecting their needs and flouting his responsibilities. For this, Daksha cursed him to wither and die. The daughters intervened and made his death periodic, symbolized by the waxing and waning of the moon.

Contents

Story of Shakti and Shiva

Daksha is a Sanskrit word said to be a Prajapati or one of the Brahma's sons. The equivalent meaning in English is EXPERT. One of the daughter of Prajapati (often said to be the youngest) was Shakti or Dakshayani, who had always wished to marry Shiva. Daksha forbade it, but she disobeyed him and did so anyway, finding in Shiva a doting and loving husband. Daksha disliked Shiva intensely, calling him a dirty, roaming ascetic and reviling the great yogi's cohort of goblins and ghouls.

The Yagna of Daksha

From then on, he distanced himself from his daughter, Dakshayani/Shakti, and his son-in-law, Shiva. This enmity culminated in a great sacrifice he had been hosting, one to which he invited all and sundry, family and allies, gods and rishis, courtiers and subjects. Consciously excluding Shakti from the list, he also set up a statue of Shiva, which he defiled and mocked, at the entrance to his hall. Shakti, ebullient at the thought of such a great event, and assuming that the daughter of the king was welcome no matter what, attended the festival. Snubbed by her father and treated with disdain, Shakti nonetheless maintained her composure. Indeed, even her father's refusal to invite Shiva, her husband and thus a traditionally honored member of any Hindu family, was to some extent borne.

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