Diprotodon

related topics
{specie, animal, plant}
{island, water, area}
{theory, work, human}
{build, building, house}
{land, century, early}
{game, team, player}


Diprotodon optatum
Diprotodon minor
Diprotodon loderi
Diprotodon annextans

Diprotodon, or the Giant Wombat, or the Rhinoceros Wombat, was the largest known marsupial that ever lived. along with many other members of a group of unusual species collectively called the "Australian megafauna", it may have existed from 1.6 million years ago until about 40,000 years ago (through most of the Pleistocene epoch). Diprotodon spp. fossils have been found in many places across Australia, including complete skulls and skeletons, as well as hair and foot impressions. More than one female skeleton has been found with a baby lying in its pouch. They inhabited open forest, woodlands, and grasslands, possibly staying close to water, and eating leaves, shrubs, and some grasses. The largest specimens were hippopotamus-sized: about three meters (10 feet long) from nose to tail, standing two meters (6 ft 7) tall at the shoulder and weighing up to 2,786 kg (6,142 pounds).[1][2] The closest surviving relatives are the wombats and the koala.

It is suggested that diprotodonts may have been an inspiration for the legends of the bunyip, as some Australian Aborigine tribes identify Diprotodon bones as those of "bunyips".[3]

Contents

Discovery

The first recorded Diprotodon remains were discovered in a cave near Wellington in New South Wales in the early 1830s by Major Thomas Mitchell who sent them to England for study by Sir Richard Owen. In the 1840s Ludwig Leichhardt discovered many Diprotodon bones eroding from the banks of creeks in the Darling Downs of Queensland and when reporting the find to Owens commented that the remains were so well preserved he expected to find living examples in the then unexplored central regions of Australia.

Full article ▸

related documents
Vine
Turkey (bird)
Hydra (genus)
Pitcher plant
California Black Oak
Hallucigenia
Selkirk Rex
Shiba Inu
Branchiopoda
Osteichthyes
Even-toed ungulate
Marine mammal
Deuterostome
Ibizan Hound
Canchim
Chaetognatha
Haast's Eagle
Pet
Cypriniformes
Stork
Tytonidae
Sundew
Dentition
Feces
Clouded Leopard
Pythonidae
Spanish moss
German Shepherd Dog
Gaur
Homeobox