Disabled sports

related topics
{group, member, jewish}
{car, race, vehicle}
{game, team, player}
{theory, work, human}
{service, military, aircraft}
{law, state, case}

Disabled sports are sports played by persons with a disability, including physical and intellectual disabilities. As many of these based on existing sports modified to meet the needs of persons with a disability, they are sometimes referred to as adapted sports. However, not all disabled sports are adapted; several sports that have been specifically created for persons with a disability have no equivalent in able-bodied sports. Disability exists in four categories: physical, mental, permanent and temporary.

Contents

Organization and History

Organized sport for athletes with a disability is generally divided into three broad disability groups: the deaf, people with physical disabilities, and people with intellectual disabilities. Each group has a distinct history, organization, competition program, and approach to sport.

Formal international competition in deaf sport began with the 1924 Paris Silent Games, organized by the Comité International des Sports des Sourds, CISS (The International Committee of Sports for the Deaf). These games evolved into the modern Deaflympics, governed by the CISS. The CISS maintains separate games for deaf athletes based on their numbers, their special communication needs on the sports field, and the social interaction that is a vital part of sports.[1]

Organized sport for persons with physical disabilities developed out of rehabilitation programs. Following the Second World War, in response to the needs of large numbers injured ex-service members and civilians, sport was introduced as a key part of rehabilitation. Sport for rehabilitation grew into recreational sport and then into competitive sport. The pioneer of this approach was Sir Ludwig Guttmann of the Stoke Mandeville Hospital in England. In 1948, while the Olympic Games were being held in London, he organized a sports competition for wheelchair athletes at Stoke Mandeville. This was the origin of the Stoke Mandeville Games, which evolved into the modern Paralympic Games. Currently, Paralympic sport is governed by the International Paralympic Committee, in conjunction with a wide range of other international sport organizations.[2]

Sport for persons with intellectual disabilities began to be organized in the 1960s through the Special Olympics movement. This grew out of a series of summer camps organized by Eunice Kennedy Shriver, beginning in 1962. In 1968 the first international Special Olympics were held, in Chicago. Today, Special Olympics provides training and competition in a variety of sports for persons with intellectual disabilities.[3]

Full article ▸

related documents
Sverok
Reform Judaism
Sisters of Mercy
Timeline of Jewish history
Kollel
List of Unitarians, Universalists, and Unitarian Universalists
Brethren
Samaritans (charity)
Mensa International
Religious denomination
Ecovillage
BTCV
Great Renaming
Modern pentathlon
Torah Judaism
Athletics at the 1896 Summer Olympics
United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism
Lemba
Hebrews
Pioneer movement
Joel Roth
Jewish Theological Seminary of America
Mattachine Society
Nijinsky II
TEJO
Jochem Uytdehaage
Ron Turcotte
FurryMUCK
Tom Burke (athlete)
Judenrat