Dracula

related topics
{god, call, give}
{film, series, show}
{son, year, death}
{work, book, publish}
{theory, work, human}
{war, force, army}
{country, population, people}
{land, century, early}
{build, building, house}
{church, century, christian}
{woman, child, man}
{ship, engine, design}
{specie, animal, plant}
{law, state, case}
{island, water, area}
{household, population, female}
{day, year, event}

Dracula is an 1897 novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, featuring as its primary antagonist the vampire Count Dracula. It was first published as a hardcover in 1897 by Archibald Constable and Co.[1]

Dracula has been attributed to many literary genres including vampire literature, horror fiction, the gothic novel and invasion literature. Structurally it is an epistolary novel, that is, told as a series of letters, diary entries, ships' logs, etc. Literary critics have examined many themes in the novel, such as the role of women in Victorian culture, conventional and conservative sexuality, immigration, colonialism, postcolonialism and folklore. Although Stoker did not invent the vampire, the novel's influence on the popularity of vampires has been singularly responsible for many theatrical, film and television interpretations since its publication.

Contents

Plot summary

The novel is mainly composed of journal entries and letters written by several narrators who also serve as the novel's main protagonists; Stoker supplemented the story with occasional newspaper clippings to relate events not directly witnessed by the story's characters. The tale begins with Jonathan Harker, a newly qualified English solicitor, journeying by train and carriage from England to Count Dracula's crumbling, remote castle (situated in the Carpathian Mountains on the border of Transylvania, Bukovina and Moldavia). The purpose of his mission is to provide legal support to Dracula for a real estate transaction overseen by Harker's employer, Peter Hawkins, of Exeter in England. At first enticed by Dracula's gracious manner, Harker soon discovers that he has become a prisoner in the castle. He also begins to see disquieting facets of Dracula's nocturnal life. One night while searching for a way out of the castle, and against Dracula's strict admonition not to venture outside his room at night, Harker falls under the spell of three wanton female vampires, the Brides of Dracula. He is saved at the last second by the Count, because he wants to keep Harker alive just long enough to obtain needed legal advice and teachings about England and London (Dracula's planned travel destination was to be among the "teeming millions"). Harker barely escapes from the castle with his life. Not long afterward, a Russian ship, the Demeter, having weighed anchor at Varna, runs aground on the shores of Whitby, England, during a fierce tempest. All of the crew are missing and presumed dead, and only one body is found, that of the captain tied to the ship's helm. The captain's log is recovered and tells of strange events that had taken place during the ship's journey. These events led to the gradual disappearance of the entire crew apparently owing to a malevolent presence on board the ill-fated ship. An animal described as a large dog is seen on the ship leaping ashore. The ship's cargo is described as silver sand and boxes of "mould", or earth, from Transylvania.

Full article ▸

related documents
Rachel Summers
Final Fantasy V
Lord Voldemort
Greyhawk
Phoenix (comics)
Diablo II
Wandering Jew
Goliath
Legolas
Tom Bombadil
Elfquest
Gandalf
The Chronicles of Amber
Siren
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
Cúchulainn
Mummy
Lethe
Jason
Fomorians
Njörðr
Satyr
Nazgûl
Inanna
Epic of Gilgamesh
Jester
Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam
Dionysus
Legend of Osiris and Isis
Avalon