Echinococcosis

related topics
{disease, patient, cell}
{specie, animal, plant}
{day, year, event}
{food, make, wine}

Echinococcosis, which is often times referred to as hydatid disease or echinococcal disease, is a parasitic disease that affects both humans and other mammals, such as sheep, dogs, rodents and horses.[1] There are three different forms of echinococcosis found in humans, each of which is caused by the larval stages of different species of the tapeworm of genus Echinococcus. The first of the three and also the most common form found in humans is cystic echinococcosis (also known as unilocular echinococcosis), which is caused by Echinococcus granulosus. The second is alveolar echinococcosis (also known as alveolar colloid of the liver, alveolar hydatid disease, alveolococcosis, multilocular echinococcosis, “small fox tapeworm”), which is caused by Echinococcus multilocularis and the third is polycystic echinococcosis (also known as human polycystic hydatid disease, neotropical echinococcosis), which is caused by Echinococcus vogeli and very rarely, Echinococcus oligarthus. Alveolar and polycystic echinococcosis are rarely diagnosed in humans and are not as widespread as cystic echinococcosis, but polycystic echinococcosis is relatively new on the medical scene and is often left out of conversations dealing with echinococcosis, and alveolar echinococcosis is a serious disease that not only has a significantly high fatality rate but also has the potential to become an emerging disease in many countries.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Circulatory system
Paralysis
Gastrointestinal tract
Achondroplasia
Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease
Exocrine gland
Peritoneum
Gynaecology
Obstetrics
Q fever
Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome
Tumor suppressor gene
Catatonia
Breast reconstruction
Cerebral cortex
Meconium aspiration syndrome
Goitre
Spasticity
Laudanum
Dendritic cell
Tylenol
Cardiomyopathy
Vulvodynia
Pupil
Human body
Cerebral arteriovenous malformation
Nerve
White blood cell
Thalamus
Leprosy