Egyptology

related topics
{church, century, christian}
{god, call, give}
{theory, work, human}
{language, word, form}
{mi², represent, 1st}

Egyptology (from Egypt and Greek -λογία, -logia. Arabic: علم المصريات‎) is the study of ancient Egyptian history, language, literature, religion, and art from the 5th millennium BC until the end of its native religious practices in the AD 4th century. A practitioner of the discipline is an Egyptologist. In Europe, particularly on the Continent, Egyptology is primarily regarded as being a philological discipline, while in North America it is often regarded as a branch of archaeology.

Contents

Development of the field

The first Egyptologists

The first Egyptologists were the ancient Egyptians themselves. Thutmose IV restored the Sphinx and had the dream that inspired his restoration carved on the famous Dream Stele. Less than two centuries later, Prince Khaemweset, fourth son of Ramesses II, is famed for identifying and restoring historic buildings, tombs and temples including the pyramid.[1]

Graeco-Roman Period

Some of the first historical accounts of Egypt were given by Herodotus, Strabo, Diodorus Siculus and the largely lost work of Manetho, an Egyptian priest, during the reign of Ptolemy I and Ptolemy II in the 3rd century BC.

Muslim Egyptologists

Full article ▸

related documents
Apollos
Alba Longa
Liturgy
Crown (headgear)
Shravanabelagola
Hieronymus Bosch
Presbyterorum Ordinis
Pope Anicetus
Cathedral of Santa Eulalia
Viaticum
Saint Anne
Halicarnassus
Contrapposto
Termini Imerese
Arthur Evans
Temple of Heaven
Priory
Lindisfarne Gospels
Sienese School
Peggy Guggenheim Collection
Étienne-Louis Boullée
Andrew Bobola
St Benet's Abbey
Frieze
Agathias
Margam Abbey
Château de Saumur
Luxeuil-les-Bains
Orientalium Ecclesiarum
Thyatira