Fibronectin

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Fibronectin is a high-molecular weight (~440kDa) extracellular matrix glycoprotein that binds to membrane-spanning receptor proteins called integrins.[1] In addition to integrins, fibronectin also binds extracellular matrix components such as collagen, fibrin and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (e.g. syndecans).

Fibronectin exists as a dimer, consisting of two nearly identical monomers linked by a pair of disulfide bonds.[1] The fibronectin protein is produced from a single gene, but alternative splicing of its pre-mRNA leads to the creation of several isoforms.

Two types of fibronectin are present in vertebrates:[1]

Fibronectin plays a major role in cell adhesion, growth, migration and differentiation, and it is important for processes such as wound healing and embryonic development.[1] Altered fibronectin expression, degradation, and organization has been associated with a number of pathologies, including cancer and fibrosis.[2]

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