Fishing reel

related topics
{@card@, make, design}
{water, park, boat}
{ship, engine, design}
{car, race, vehicle}
{system, computer, user}
{rate, high, increase}

A fishing reel is a device used for the deployment and retrieval of a fishing line using a spool mounted on an axle. Fishing reels are traditionally used in the recreational sport of angling. They are most often used in conjunction with a fishing rod, though some specialized reels are mounted directly to boat gunwales or transoms. The earliest known illustration of a fishing reel is from Chinese paintings and records beginning about 1195 AD. Fishing reels first appeared in England around 1650 AD, and by the 1760s, London tackle shops were advertising multiplying or gear-retrieved reels. Paris, Kentucky native George Snyder is generally given credit for inventing the first fishing reel in America around 1820, a bait casting design that quickly became popular with American anglers.

Contents

History

In literary records, the earliest evidence of the fishing reel comes from a 4th century AD[1][2] work entitled Lives of Famous Immortals.[3][4] The earliest known depiction of a fishing reel comes from a Southern Song (1127–1279) painting done in 1195 by Ma Yuan (c. 1160–1225) called "Angler on a Wintry Lake," showing a man sitting on a small sampan boat while casting out his fishing line.[5] Another fishing reel was featured in a painting by Wu Zhen (1280–1354).[5] The book Tianzhu lingqian (Holy Lections from Indian Sources), printed sometime between 1208 and 1224, features two different woodblock print illustrations of fishing reels being used.[5] An Armenian parchment Gospel of the 13th century shows a reel (though not as clearly depicted as the Chinese ones).[5] The Sancai Tuhui, a Chinese encyclopedia published in 1609, features the next known picture of a fishing reel and vividly shows the windlass pulley of the device.[5] These five pictures mentioned are the only ones which feature fishing reels before the year 1651 (when the first English illustration was made); after that year they became commonly depicted in world art.[5]

Full article ▸

related documents
Tatting
Textile
Stencil duplicator
Wire
Linen
View camera
Floor
Horseshoe
Wakeboarding
Mace (club)
Spinning (textiles)
Screen-printing
Seal (device)
Lithography
Loom
Paper clip
Punk fashion
Parchment
Denim
Leather
Wood router
Kinder Surprise
Knot
Printing
Invisible ink
Lumber
Body piercing
Geodesic dome
Pencil
Thatching