Fort Scott, Kansas

related topics
{area, community, home}
{city, population, household}
{household, population, family}
{day, year, event}
{war, force, army}
{black, white, people}
{school, student, university}
{build, building, house}
{land, century, early}
{utc_offset, utc_offset_dst, timezone}
{film, series, show}
{area, part, region}
{town, population, incorporate}
{county, mile, population}

Fort Scott is a city in Bourbon County, Kansas, United States, 88 miles (158 km) south of Kansas City, on the Marmaton River. The population was 8,297 at the 2000 census, and it was estimated to be 7,976 in the year 2006.[3] Fort Scott is the county seat of Bourbon County, and is the home of the Fort Scott National Historic Site.

Contents

History

Established and garrisoned by the U.S. Army from 1842–1853, soldiers at Fort Scott assisted with the protection of the Permanent Indian Frontier. After the army abandoned the fort in 1853, the buildings were purchased by local settlers at a government auction in 1855. The former military post became the center of one of the largest towns in Kansas Territory.

Between 1855 and 1861, the citizens of Fort Scott experienced the violent unrest that preceded the American Civil War on the Kansas and Missouri border. Eastern newspapers described this violence as "Bleeding Kansas", a result of the national controversy concerning the extension of slavery into the new territories. Murder, mayhem, robbery, and arson were committed by bold free-state and pro-slavery advocates in the name of their cause. On January 29, 1861, Kansas entered the union as a free state, but the turmoil of "Bleeding Kansas" continued throughout the Civil War.

During the Civil War, Fort Scott was a U.S Army district Headquarters, quartermaster supply depot, training center, and recruitment station. It was strategically vital to the defense of Kansas and the Midwest. A battle over the fort occurred in August 1861 just across the Missouri line in the Battle of Dry Wood Creek. The battle was a pro-South victory for Sterling Price and his Missouri State Guard. Price did not hold the fort and instead continued a northern push into Missouri in an attempt to recapture the state. James H. Lane (Senator) was to launch a Jayhawker offensive behind Price from Fort Scott that led to the Sacking of Osceola. The ill will of these actions was to be the basis for the 1976 Clint Eastwood film The Outlaw Josey Wales.

Full article ▸

related documents
Niles, Ohio
Glendale, Wisconsin
Lakewood, Ohio
Columbiana, Ohio
Green, Ohio
Indian Hill, Ohio
Canfield, Ohio
Casa Grande, Arizona
Langley, Washington
Cheviot, Ohio
Lemmon, South Dakota
Mentor, Ohio
Medina, Ohio
Vandalia, Ohio
Defiance, Ohio
St. Clairsville, Ohio
Carlsbad, New Mexico
Monte Sereno, California
Orrville, Ohio
Bend, Oregon
Bluefield, Virginia
Vestavia Hills, Alabama
Brecksville, Ohio
Mockingbird Valley, Kentucky
Newark, Ohio
North Oaks, Minnesota
Broomfield, Colorado
Huber Heights, Ohio
Bay Village, Ohio
Riverton, Utah