G-spot

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The Gräfenberg Spot, often called the G-Spot, is the bean-shaped[1] area of the vagina that many women report to contain an erogenous zone which when stimulated can lead to high levels of sexual arousal, powerful orgasms and female ejaculation.[2] The Gräfenberg Spot is typically located one to three inches (2.5 to 7.6 cm) up the front (anterior) vaginal wall between the vaginal opening and the urethra[3] and is a sensitive area that is part of the female prostate.[4]

Although research on the G-Spot has taken place since the 1940s,[5] arguments over its existence as a distinct structure, definition and location continue.[6][7] A 2009 British study on the G-Spot found its existence unproven and subjective based on questionnaires and personal experience.[8] There is also hypotheses that the G-Spot is an extension of the clitoris and that this is the cause of vaginal orgasms.[9][10] However, contemporary studies using ultrasound have found physiological evidence of the G-Spot for women who report having orgasms during intercourse.[11][12]

Sexual psychologists are concerned women may label themselves "dysfunctional" if they cannot find a G-Spot.[13] Plastic surgery has been used by women to enhance sensitivity with a procedure called G-Spot amplification.[5]

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