Gilgamesh

related topics
{god, call, give}
{build, building, house}
{island, water, area}
{language, word, form}
{war, force, army}
{city, population, household}
{church, century, christian}
{mi², represent, 1st}

Gilgamesh (Akkadian cuneiform: 𒄑𒂆𒈦 [𒄑𒂆𒈦], Gilgameš, also known as Bilgames in the earliest text[1]) was the fourth king of Uruk (Early Dynastic II, first dynasty of Uruk), ruling 126 years, according to the Sumerian king list. He was said to be contemporary with some of the earliest archaeologically-known figures, placing his reign ca. 2500 BC. According to the Tummal Inscription,[2] Gilgamesh, and his son Urlugal, rebuilt the sanctuary of the goddess Ninlil, in Tummal, a sacred quarter in her city of Nippur. Gilgamesh is the central character in the Epic of Gilgamesh, the greatest surviving work of early Mesopotamian literature. In the epic his father was Lugalbanda and his mother was Ninsun (whom some call Rimat Ninsun), a goddess. In Mesopotamian mythology, Gilgamesh is credited with having been a demigod of superhuman strength who built a great city wall to defend his people from external threats and travelled to meet Utnapishtim, the sage who had survived the Great Deluge.

Contents

Cuneiform references

In the Epic of Gilgamesh, Gilgamesh is credited with the building of the legendary walls of Uruk. An alternative version has Gilgamesh telling Urshanabi, the ferryman, that the city's walls were built by the Seven Sages. In historical times, Sargon of Akkad claimed to have destroyed these walls to prove his military power.

Fragments of an epic text found in Me-Turan (modern Tell Haddad) relate that at the end of his life Gilgamesh was buried under the river bed. The people of Uruk diverted the flow of the Euphrates passing Uruk for the purpose of burying the dead king within the river bed. In April 2003, a German expedition claimed to have discovered his last resting place.[3]

Full article ▸

related documents
Naraka
Mímir
Bharat Mata
Harpocrates
Lleu Llaw Gyffes
Golden Fleece
Atum
Saint Veronica
Buto
Arachne
Roman mythology
Vanth
Ariadne
Endovelicus
Lupercalia
Ammon
Iris (mythology)
Geryon
Typhon
Semele
Amphitrite
Aradia (goddess)
Boötes
Gideon (Bible)
Paean
Eärendil
Hermóðr
Pyramus and Thisbe
Agdistis
Taurus (constellation)