Haines, Alaska

related topics
{household, population, female}
{water, park, boat}
{city, large, area}
{land, century, early}
{city, population, household}
{area, community, home}
{law, state, case}
{service, military, aircraft}
{school, student, university}
{rate, high, increase}
{line, north, south}
{area, part, region}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{theory, work, human}

Haines is a census-designated place (CDP) in Haines Borough, Alaska, United States. As of the 2000 census, the population of the area was 1,811. Haines was formerly a city but no longer has a municipal government. In October 2002, voters approved a measure consolidating the city of Haines and Haines Borough into a home rule borough.[1]

Contents

History

The area around present-day Haines was called "'Dtehshuh" or "end of the trail" by the Chilkat group of Tlingit. It received this name because they could portage (carry) their canoes from the trail they used to trade with the interior, which began at the outlet of the Chilkat River, to Dtehshuh and save 32 km (20 miles) of rowing around the Chilkat Peninsula.

The first European, George Dickinson, an agent for the North West Trading Company, settled at Dtehshuh in 1880.

In 1881, the Chilkat asked Sheldon Jackson to send missionaries to the area. S. Young Hall, a Presbyterian minister, was sent. He built the Willard mission and school at Dtehshuh, on land given the church by the Chilkat. The mission was renamed Haines in 1884 in honor of Mrs. F. E. Haines, the chairwoman of the committee that raised funds for its construction.

The boundary between Canada and the U.S. was then only vaguely defined (see Alaska boundary dispute). There were overlapping land claims from the United States' purchase of Alaska from Russia in 1867 and British claims along the coast. Canada had requested a survey after British Columbia united with it in 1871, but the idea was rejected by the United States as being too costly given the area's remoteness, sparse settlement, and limited economic or strategic interest.

The Klondike Gold Rush of 1898–1899 changed the region greatly. The population of the general area increased enormously and reached 30,000, composed largely of Americans. Haines grew as a supply center, since the Dalton Trail from Chilkat Inlet offered a route to the Yukon for prospectors. Gold was also discovered 36 miles from Haines in 1899 at the Porcupine District. During this time the name Haines came into use for the area around the mission and not for just the mission itself.

Full article ▸

related documents
Chatham, Michigan
Hyrum, Utah
Livingston, Montana
Bath (Berkeley Springs), West Virginia
Lewisburg, West Virginia
York, Maine
Hailey, Idaho
Big Bear Lake, California
Chesapeake Beach, Maryland
North Richland Hills, Texas
Jackson, Wyoming
Vinalhaven, Maine
Stowe, Vermont
Cashmere, Washington
Ferndale, California
Oakley, Utah
Monhegan, Maine
Edna Bay, Alaska
Pella, Iowa
Lebanon, New Hampshire
Spencer, Iowa
Kernville, California
Corning, California
Whitefish, Montana
North Haven, Maine
Mandeville, Louisiana
Montesano, Washington
Greig, New York
Donaldsonville, Louisiana
Dyersburg, Tennessee