Harry Seidler

related topics
{city, large, area}
{theory, work, human}
{build, building, house}
{son, year, death}
{work, book, publish}
{@card@, make, design}
{church, century, christian}
{island, water, area}
{area, community, home}
{group, member, jewish}
{water, park, boat}

Harry Seidler, AC OBE (25 June 1923 Vienna — 9 March 2006 Sydney) was an Austrian-born Australian architect who is considered to be one of the leading exponents of Modernism's methodology in Australia and the first architect to fully express the principles of the Bauhaus in Australia.

Harry Seidler designed more than 180 buildings[1] and he received much recognition for his contribution to Architecture of Australia. Seidler consistently won architectural awards every decade throughout his Australian career of almost 58 years across the varied categories - his residential work from 1950, his commercial work from 1967, and his public commissions from the 1970s.

Contents

Early life

Seidler was born in Vienna, the son of a prosperous Jewish merchant of Romanian origin.[2] He fled as a teenager to England when Nazi Germany occupied Austria in 1938.

Education

In England, he studied building and construction at Cambridgeshire Technical School. In May 1940, he was interned by the British authorities as an enemy alien, before being shipped to Quebec, Canada and continued to be interned until October 1941, when he was released on parole from internment to study architecture at the University of Manitoba.[3]

Although he was ten years old when the Bauhaus was closed, Seidler's analysts invariably associate him with the Bauhaus because he later studied under emigrent Bauhaus teachers in the USA. He attended Harvard Graduate School of Design under Walter Gropius and Marcel Breuer on a scholarship in 1945-46,[4] during which time he did vacation work with Alvar Aalto in Boston drawing up plans for the Baker dormitory at MIT. He then attended Black Mountain College under the painter Josef Albers, and then worked for Marcel Breuer in New York.[3] Seidler also worked in the studio of the architect Oscar Niemeyer in Rio de Janeiro.[4]

Full article ▸

related documents
Blackheath, London
London King's Cross railway station
Ilford
Astana
Fulham
Innsbruck
Amersham
London Borough of Waltham Forest
Brentford
Holloway, London
Houten
Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation
Osnabrück
Lusaka
Castleford
Marburg
Dewsbury
Hellevoetsluis
Whitechapel
Willesden
Minot, North Dakota
Marsden, West Yorkshire
Le Havre
Lilongwe
Slavonski Brod
Katoomba, New South Wales
Science museum
Porirua
Borås
Shoreditch