Hemolysis

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Hemolysis (or haemolysis)—from the Greek αἷμα (aima, haema, hemo-) meaning "blood" and λύσις (lusis, lysis, -lysis) meaning a "loosing", "setting free" or "releasing"[1]—is the rupturing of erythrocytes (red blood cells) and the release of their contents (hemoglobin) into surrounding fluid (e.g., blood plasma). Hemolysis may occur in vivo or in vitro (inside or outside the body).

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In vivo hemolysis can be caused by a large number of medical conditions, including many Gram-positive bacteria (e.g., streptococcus, enterococcus, and staphylococcus), some parasites (e.g., malaria), some autoimmune disorders (e.g., hemolytic disease of the newborn), and some genetic disorders (e.g., sickle-cell disease or G6PD deficiency).

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