High-density lipoprotein

related topics
{disease, patient, cell}
{acid, form, water}
{rate, high, increase}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{woman, child, man}

High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is one of the five major groups of lipoproteins which, in order of sizes, largest to smallest, are chylomicrons, VLDL, IDL, LDL and HDL, which enable lipids like cholesterol and triglycerides to be transported within the water-based bloodstream. In healthy individuals, about thirty percent of blood cholesterol is carried by HDL.[1]

Blood tests typically report HDL-C, the amount of cholesterol contained in HDL particles. It is often contrasted with low density or LDL cholesterol or LDL-C. HDL particles are able to remove cholesterol from atheroma[citation needed] within arteries and transport it back to the liver for excretion or re-utilization, which is the main reason why the cholesterol carried within HDL particles, termed HDL-C, is sometimes called "good cholesterol". Those with higher levels of HDL-C seem to have fewer problems with cardiovascular diseases, while those with low HDL-C cholesterol levels (less than 40 mg/dL or about 1 mmol/L) have increased rates for heart disease.[1][citation needed]. However, see the clarifications below about estimating HDL particles via cholesterol content versus directly measuring HDL particles and function. Additionally, those few individuals producing an abnormal, apparently more efficient, HDL ApoA1 protein variant called ApoA-1 Milano, have low measured HDL-C levels yet very low rates of cardiovascular events even with high blood cholesterol values[citation needed].

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Hypothyroidism
Coronary circulation
Niacin
Pancreas
Scleroderma
Carbamazepine
Sodium thiopental
Systemic lupus erythematosus
Tinnitus
Prostate
Phenytoin
Paroxetine
Flunitrazepam
Dentistry
Encephalitis
Cataract
Bacillus Calmette-Guérin
Psychosurgery
Prader-Willi syndrome
Jaundice
Kidney
Adenosine
Surgery
Group A streptococcal infection
Thymus
Abscess
Bilirubin
Sleep disorder
Theophylline
Canine distemper