Hypatia of Alexandria

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Hypatia (play /hˈpʃə/; Greek: Ὑπατία, Hypatía; born between AD 350 and 370; died March 415) was a Greek[1][2] scholar from Alexandria, Egypt, considered the first notable woman in mathematics,[3][4][5] who also taught philosophy and astronomy.[6] She lived in Roman Egypt, and was killed by a Christian mob who accused her of causing religious turmoil.[7] Some suggest that her murder marked the end of what is traditionally known as Classical antiquity,[8][9] although others such as Maria Dzielska and Christian Wildberg observe that Hellenistic philosophy continued to flourish in the 5th and 6th centuries, Wildberg suggests until the age of Justinian.[10][11]

A Neoplatonist philosopher, she belonged to the mathematical tradition of the Academy of Athens represented by Eudoxus of Cnidus;[12] she followed the school of the 3rd century thinker Plotinus, discouraging empirical enquiry and encouraging logical and mathematical studies.[13] The name Hypatia derives from the adjective ὑπάτη, the feminine form of ὕπατος (upatos), meaning "highest, uppermost, supremest".[14][15]

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