Hypereides

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Hypereides (Greek Ὑπερείδης, Hypereidēs; c. 390–322 BCE) was a logographer (speech writer) in Ancient Greece. He was one of the ten Attic orators included in the "Alexandrian Canon" compiled by Aristophanes of Byzantium and Aristarchus of Samothrace in the third century BCE.

Contents

Rise to power

Little is known about his early life except that he was the son of Glaucippus, of the deme of Collytus and that he studied logography under Isocrates. In 360 BCE he prosecuted Autocles for treason.[1] During the Social War (358–355 BCE) he accused Aristophon, then one of the most influential men at Athens, of malpractices,[2] and impeached Philocrates (343 BCE) for high treason. Although Hypereides supported Demosthenes in the struggle against Phillip II of Macedon; that support was withdrawn after the Harpalus affair. After Demosthenes' exile Hypereides became the head of the patriotic party (324 BCE).

Downfall

After the death of Alexander the Great, Hypereides was one of the chief promoters of war against Macedonian rule. His speeches are believed to have led to the outbreak of the Lamian war (323–322 BCE) in which Athens, Aetolia, and Thessaly revolted against Macedon rule. After the decisive defeat at Crannon (322 BCE) in which Athens and her allies lost their independence, Hypereides and the other orators, were condemned to death by the Athenian supporters of Macedonia.

Hypereides fled to Aegina only to be captured at the temple of Poseidon. After being put to death his body (according to others) was taken to Cleonae and shown to the Macedonian general Antipater before being returned to Athens for burial.

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