Ichor

related topics
{god, call, give}
{disease, patient, cell}
{film, series, show}
{specie, animal, plant}
{theory, work, human}
{black, white, people}

In Greek mythology, ichor (pronounced /ˈaɪkər/ or /ˈɪkər/; Greek ἰχώρ) is the ethereal fluid that is the Greek gods' blood, sometimes said to have been present in ambrosia or nectar.[citation needed] When a god was injured and bled, the ichor made his or her blood poisonous to mortals.[citation needed] Great demigods and heroes occasionally attacked gods and released ichor, but gods rarely did so to each other in Homeric myth.

Ichor was considered to be golden in color.

Apart from mythology, poets since Victorian times have used it to mean a divine drink, often wine.

Contents

In robotics

Crete, an island whose mythology was appropriated by the Greeks, has in the Greek version a robot called Talos, a giant man of bronze in Ancient Crete with wings and more like a large cupid in appearance, but in Ancient Greece more like the Colossus of Rhodes, a robot powered by ichor and stoppable by taking out a nail in Talos' back. He guarded Europa on Crete and threw boulders at intruders until the Argonauts came to get the Golden Fleece and the sorceress Medea took out the nail.

In medieval Christendom

In pathology, "ichor" is an antiquated term for a watery discharge from a wound or ulcer with an unpleasant or fetid (offensive) smell.[1] The Greek Christian writer Clement of Alexandria used "ichor" in this sense in a polemic against the pagan Greek gods.[citation needed]

In fiction

H. P. Lovecraft often used "ichor" in his descriptions of other-worldly creatures, most prominently in his nightmarish detail of the remains of Wilbur Whateley, in "The Dunwich Horror". The term "ichor" is often used in fantasy contexts by authors as a synonym for "blood" or "ooze", to the point that it has become clichéd. Author Ursula K. Le Guin, in "From Elfland to Poughkeepsie", calls the term "the infallible touchstone of the seventh-rate."[2]

Full article ▸

related documents
Asclepieion
Þrúðgelmir
Áine
Álfröðull
Fulla
Oya
Aegimius
Tongahiti
Biróg
Huracan
Beli (Norse giant)
Hatmehit
La Espero
Hati Hróðvitnisson
Crius
Nantosuelta
Book of Jarom
Marassa Jumeaux
Ainu (Middle-earth)
Job: A Comedy of Justice
Bahram V
Meret
Shu (Egyptian deity)
Achish
Major Arcana
Virtus (deity)
Arduinna
Phemonoe
Chac Mool
Moneta