Jeremiah

related topics
{god, call, give}
{son, year, death}
{church, century, christian}
{war, force, army}
{day, year, event}
{group, member, jewish}
{album, band, music}
{city, population, household}
{town, population, incorporate}
{land, century, early}
{language, word, form}

Jeremiah pronounced /dʒɛrɨˈmaɪ.ə/ [1] (Hebrewיִרְמְיָה , Modern Hebrew:Yirməyāhū, IPA: jirməˈjaːhu, Tiberian:Yirmĭyahu, Greek:Ἰερεμίας), meaning "Yahweh exalts",[2] was one of the main prophets of the Hebrew Bible. His writings are put together in the Book of Jeremiah.

In Judeo-Christianity, Jeremiah is traditionally credited with authoring the Book of Jeremiah, 1 Kings, 2 Kings and the Book of Lamentations [3] with the assistance and under the editorship of Baruch ben Neriah, his scribe and disciple.

Judaism considers the Book of Jeremiah part of its canon, and regards Jeremiah as the second of the major prophets. Christianity regards Jeremiah as a saint and a prophet. The New Testament quotes Jeremiah,[4] and it has been interpreted that Jeremiah “spiritualized and individualized religion and insisted upon the primacy of the individual’s relationship with God.”[5]

Jeremiah came from a landowning family.[6] It is mentioned that he's had a joyful early life,[7] however, the difficulties in Jeremiah and the Book of Lamentations has prompted scholars to refer to him as “the weeping prophet.”[8]

The Lord called Jeremiah to prophetic ministry in c. 626 BC,[9] about one year after Josiah king of Judah had turned the nation toward repentance from the widespread idolatrous practices of his father and grandfather. Ultimately, Josiah’s reforms would not be enough to preserve Judah and Jerusalem from destruction, because the sins of Manasseh, Josiah’s grandfather, had gone too far.[10] Such was the lust of the nation for false gods that after Josiah’s death, the nation would quickly return to the gods of the surrounding nations.[11] Jeremiah was appointed to reveal the sins of the people and the coming consequences.[12][13]

Jeremiah was attacked by his own brothers,[14] beaten and put into the stocks by a priest and false prophet,[15] imprisoned by the king,[16] threatened with death,[17] thrown into a cistern by Judah’s officials,[18] and opposed by a false prophet.[19]

Full article ▸

related documents
Pindar
Empedocles
Die Walküre
Medea
Conn of the Hundred Battles
Balarama
Agastya
Skaði
Patroclus
Sargon of Akkad
Conall Cernach
Sisyphus
Eris (mythology)
Hezekiah
Croesus
Book of Ezekiel
Gwydion
Theogony
Durin
The Empress (Tarot card)
Valaquenta
Ishtar
Hippolyta
Lapith
Loki
Ullr
Þjazi
Trophonius
Joshua
Valinor