Kirby Puckett

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Kirby Puckett (March 14, 1960 – March 6, 2006) was a Major League Baseball center fielder. He played his entire 12-year baseball career with the Minnesota Twins (1984-1995). He is the Twins franchise's all-time leader (1961–present) in career hits, runs, doubles and total bases. His .318 career batting average was the highest by any right-handed American League batter in the second half of the 20th century.

Puckett was the fourth baseball player during the 20th century to record 1,000 hits in his first five full calendar years in Major League Baseball, and one of only two to record 2,000 hits during his first ten full calendar years. After being forced to retire at age 35 due to loss of vision in one eye from glaucoma, he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2001 in his first year of eligibility.

On March 5, 2006, Puckett suffered a stroke at his home in Arizona. He died the next day.

Contents

Early life

Puckett was born in Chicago, Illinois and grew up in the Robert Taylor Homes, a Chicago housing project.[1] He was the youngest of nine children. Puckett attended Calumet High School, and won High School All American Honors in baseball.[2] He briefly attended Bradley University before transferring to Triton College in River Grove, Illinois.[3] Puckett was subsequently drafted by the Twins in the first round of the 1982 Major League Baseball Draft.[4]

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