Lassa fever

related topics
{disease, patient, cell}
{specie, animal, plant}
{acid, form, water}
{woman, child, man}
{line, north, south}
{service, military, aircraft}
{household, population, female}
{town, population, incorporate}

Lassa fever is an acute viral hemorrhagic fever first described in 1969 in the town of Lassa, in Borno State, Nigeria located in the Yedseram river valley at the south end of Lake Chad.[1] Clinical cases of the disease had been known for over a decade earlier but not connected with this viral pathogen. The infection is endemic in West African countries, and causes 300,000–500,000 cases annually with approximately 5,000 deaths.[2] Outbreaks of the disease have been observed in Nigeria, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, and the Central African Republic, but it is believed that human infections also exist in Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mali, and Senegal. Its primary animal host is the Natal Multimammate Mouse (Mastomys natalensis), an animal indigenous to most of Sub-Saharan Africa.[3] Although the rodents are also a source of protein for peoples of these areas, the virus is probably transmitted by the contact with the feces and urine of animals accessing grain stores in residences.[3]

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
HIV vaccine
Glaucoma
Cirrhosis
Typhoid fever
Lymph node
Dermatology
Hernia
Intensive insulinotherapy
Scar
Botulism
Vagus nerve
Chronic pain
Ménière's disease
Metastasis
Sickle-cell disease
Tetanus
Haemophilia
Osteoporosis
Urinary tract infection
Epinephrine
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
Rett syndrome
Bloodletting
Stimulant
Periodontitis
Temporomandibular joint disorder
Cerebrospinal fluid
Metabolic syndrome
Dieting
Psychopharmacology