Locative case

related topics
{language, word, form}
{city, large, area}
{island, water, area}
{city, population, household}
{math, energy, light}
{school, student, university}
{town, population, incorporate}

Locative (abbreviated loc) is a grammatical case which indicates a location. It corresponds vaguely to the English prepositions "in", "on", "at", and "by". The locative case belongs to the general local cases together with the lative and separative case.

The locative case exists in many language groups.

Contents

Indo-European languages

The Proto-Indo-European language had a locative case expressing "place where", an adverbial function. The ending depended on the last vowel of the stem (consonant, a-, o-, i-, u-stems) and the number (singular or plural). Subsequently the locative case tended to merge with other cases: the genitive or dative.[1] Some daughter languages retained it as a distinct case. The locative case is found in:

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