Lubin

related topics
{city, large, area}
{utc_offset, utc_offset_dst, timezone}
{area, part, region}
{war, force, army}
{build, building, house}
{land, century, early}
{town, population, incorporate}
{law, state, case}
{disease, patient, cell}
{village, small, smallsup}

Lubin [ˈlubin] (German: Lüben) is a town in Lower Silesian Voivodeship in south-western Poland. From 1975–1998 it belonged to the former Legnica Voivodeship. Lubin is the administrative seat of Lubin County, and also of the rural district called Gmina Lubin, although it is not part of the territory of the latter, as the town forms a separate urban gmina. As of the 2009 census, the town had a total population of 74,552.

Lubin is situated on the Zimnica river in the Lower Silesian historical region, about 71 km (44 mi) northwest of Wrocław and 20 km (12 mi) north of Legnica.

The third-largest Polish corporation, the KGHM Polska Miedź mining company, has its headquarters in Lubin.

Contents

History

Lubin lies midway between the main settlements of two Ślężanie tribes, the Dziadoszanie and the Trzebowianie, whose lands were subdued by King Mieszko I of Poland about 990. It is unclear which of the two tribes, if either, founded the town. One legend states that the town derives its name from Luba, a young man credited with slaying a giant bear that had been terrifying the inhabitants. A papal bull dated to circa 1155 mentions Lubin as one of 13 Silesian castellanies.

According to legend the Polish voivode Piotr Włostowic of Dunin (1080–1153) had a fieldstone church built on the hill in the west of Lubin, where about 1230 a castellany and a village arose that until today is called the Old Town (Polish: Stary Lubin). The settlement in the Duchy of Głogów was first mentioned under the Old Polish name of Lubin in a 1267 deed by Pope Clement IV as a fiefdom of Trzebnica Abbey.

The New Town of what is today Lubin was probably founded in the 1280s under the rule of Duke Przemko of Ścinawa by German settlers, maybe descending from Lower Lorraine or Franconia, in the course of the Ostsiedlung. It obtained its city rights about 1295. In 1329 Duke John of Ścinawa paid homage to King John of Bohemia, who upon the death of John's brother Duke Przemko II of Głogów in 1331 invaded the lands, which were incorporated into the Kingdom of Bohemia and shared the political fortunes of the Silesian crown land.

Full article ▸

related documents
Chojnów
Tychy
Zabrze
Radom
Hallandale Beach, Florida
Prabuty
Llívia
Kościerzyna
Beverwijk
Harold Wood
Strängnäs Municipality
Veldhoven
Starogard Gdański
Steenwijkerland
Saint-Josse-ten-Noode
Jacobswoude
Kartuzy
Zeewolde
Nyborg
Leksand Municipality
Thurne
Dunkirk
Roosendaal
Hardenberg
Lycksele Municipality
Boden Municipality
Pajala Municipality
Bolsward
Vianen
Kitchener-Waterloo