Mario Puzo

related topics
{work, book, publish}
{film, series, show}
{son, year, death}
{service, military, aircraft}
{black, white, people}
{theory, work, human}

Mario Gianluigi Puzo (October 15, 1920 – July 2, 1999) was an American author and screenwriter, known for his novels about the Mafia, including The Godfather (1969), which he later co-adapted into a film with Francis Ford Coppola. He won the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay in both 1972, and 1974.

Contents

Biography

Puzo was born in a poor family of Neapolitan immigrants living in the Hell's Kitchen neighborhood of New York.[1] Many of his books draw heavily on this heritage. After graduating from the City College of New York, he joined the United States Army Air Forces in World War II. Due to his poor eyesight, the military did not let him undertake combat duties but made him a public relations officer stationed in Germany. In 1950, his first short story, The Last Christmas, was published in American Vanguard. After the war, he wrote his first book, The Dark Arena, which was published in 1955.

At periods in the 1950s and early 1960s, Puzo worked as a writer/editor for publisher Martin Goodman's Magazine Management Company. Puzo, along with other writers like Bruce Jay Friedman, worked for the company line of men's magazines, pulp titles like Male, True Action, and Swank. Under the pseudonym Mario Cleri, Puzo wrote World War II adventure features for True Action.[2]

Puzo's most famous work, The Godfather, was first published in 1969 after he had heard anecdotes about Mafia organizations during his time in pulp journalism. He later said in an interview with Larry King that his principal motivation was to make money. He had already, after all, written two books that had received great reviews, yet had not amounted to much. As a government clerk with five children, he was looking to write something that would appeal to the masses. With a number one bestseller for months on the New York Times Best Seller List, Mario Puzo had found his target audience. The book was later developed into the film The Godfather, directed by Francis Ford Coppola. The movie received 11 Academy Award nominations, winning three, including an Oscar for Puzo for Best Adapted Screenplay. Coppola and Puzo collaborated then to work on sequels to the original film, The Godfather Part II and The Godfather Part III.

Full article ▸

related documents
Willie Rushton
Frank Harris
Albert Uderzo
Michael Ondaatje
Dino Buzzati
Michael Ende
C. L. Moore
Ed Emshwiller
T. H. White
Richard Hughes (writer)
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy: The Original Radio Scripts
I, Libertine
Henry Miller
John Willie
Susan Cooper
Robert Penn Warren
Andrew Sarris
Brian Froud
All the President's Men
BpNichol
Joan Lindsay
Bruce Nauman
C. D. Payne
Oliver Postgate
Arthur Hailey
Peter F. Hamilton
Clark Ashton Smith
Charles McCarry
John Fortune
Rohinton Mistry