Melanocyte

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Melanocytes (pronounced /mɛˈlænɵsaɪt/ ( listen)) are melanin-producing cells located in the bottom layer (the stratum basale) of the skin's epidermis, the middle layer of the eye (the uvea),[1] the inner ear,[2] meninges,[3] bones,[4] and heart.[5] Melanin is a pigment which is primarily responsible for the color of skin.

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Melanogenesis

Through a process called melanogenesis, these cells produce melanin, which is a pigment found in the skin, eyes, and hair. This melanogenesis leads to a long lasting tan which is in contrast to the tan that originates from oxidation of already existing melanin.[6]

There are both basal and activated levels of melanogenesis; lighter-skinned people generally have low basal levels of melanogenesis. Exposure to UV-B radiation causes an increased melanogenesis as a response to DNA photodamage.[7]

Since the action spectrum of sunburn and melanogenesis are virtually identical, it is assumed that they are induced by the same mechanism.[8] The agreement of the action spectrum with the absorption spectrum of DNA points towards the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (direct DNA damage). The acronym for cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers is CPDs.

Human differences

There are typically between 1000 and 2000 melanocytes per square millimeter of skin. Melanocytes comprise from 5% to 10% of the cells in the basal layer of epidermis. Although their size can vary, melanocytes are typically 7 micrometres in length.

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